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WWW/2011/tracking-protection/drafts tracking-compliance.html,1.62,1.63

From: Roy Fielding via cvs-syncmail <cvsmail@w3.org>
Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2012 19:27:41 +0000
To: public-tracking-commit@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1T2SCr-0000H0-4Q@lionel-hutz.w3.org>
Update of /w3ccvs/WWW/2011/tracking-protection/drafts
In directory hutz:/tmp/cvs-serv984

Modified Files:
	tracking-compliance.html 
Log Message:
fix typos

Index: tracking-compliance.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /w3ccvs/WWW/2011/tracking-protection/drafts/tracking-compliance.html,v
retrieving revision 1.62
retrieving revision 1.63
diff -u -d -r1.62 -r1.63
--- tracking-compliance.html	17 Aug 2012 19:21:31 -0000	1.62
+++ tracking-compliance.html	17 Aug 2012 19:27:39 -0000	1.63
@@ -134,7 +134,7 @@
 	<p>People have the right to know how data about them will be collected and how it will be used. Empowered with that knowledge, individuals can decide whether to allow their online activities to be tracked and data about them to be collected. Many Internet companies use data gathered about people's online activities to personalize content and target advertising based on their perceived interests. While some people appreciate this personalization of content and ads in certain contexts, others are troubled by what they perceive as an invasion of their privacy. For them, the benefit of personalization is not worth their concerns about allowing entities with whom they have no direct relationship to amass detailed profiles about their activities.</p>
 	<p>Therefore, users need a mechanism to express their own preference regarding tracking that is both simple to configure and efficient when implemented. In turn, Web sites that are unwilling or unable to offer content without such targeted advertising or data collection need a mechanism to indicate those requirements to the user and allow them (or their user agent) to make an individual choice regarding user-granted exceptions.</p>
 	<p>This specification defines the terminology of tracking preferences, the scope of its applicability, and the requirements on compliant first-party and third-party participants when an indication of tracking preference is received. This specification defines the meaning of a Do Not Track preference and sets out practices for websites and other online companies to comply with this preference.</p>
-	<p>A companion document, [[!!TRACKING-DNT]], defines the HTTP request header field DNT for expressing a tracking preference on the Web, a well-known location (URI) for providing a machine-readable tracking status resource that describes a service's DNT compliance, the HTTP response header field Tk for resources to communicate their compliance or non-compliance with the user's expressed preference, and JavaScript APIs for determining DNT status and requesting a site-specific, user-granted exception.</p>
+	<p>A companion document, [[!TRACKING-DNT]], defines the HTTP request header field DNT for expressing a tracking preference on the Web, a well-known location (URI) for providing a machine-readable tracking status resource that describes a service's DNT compliance, the HTTP response header field Tk for resources to communicate their compliance or non-compliance with the user's expressed preference, and JavaScript APIs for determining DNT status and requesting a site-specific, user-granted exception.</p>
 </section>
 
 <section id="scope-and-goals">
@@ -145,7 +145,7 @@
 	  Like the introduction, we will revisit and finalize once the document
 	  is more complete.
   </p>
-	<p>While there are a variety of business models to monetize content on the web, many rely on advertising. Advertisements can be targeted to a particular user's interests based on information gathered about one's online activity. While the Internet industry believes many users appreciate such targeted advertising, as well as other personalized content, there is also an understanding that some people find the practice intrusive. If this opinion becomes widespread, it could undermine the trust necessary to conduct business on the Internet. This Compliance specification and a companion [[!!TRACKING-DNT]] specification are intended to give users a means to indicate their tracking preference and to spell out the obligations of compliant websites that receive the Do Not Track message. The goal is to provide the user with choice, while allowing practices necessary for a smoothly functioning Internet. This should be a win-win for business and consumers alike. The Internet brings millions of users and web sites together in a vibrant and rich ecosystem. As the sophistication of the Internet has grown, so too has its complexity which leaves all but the most technically savvy unable to deeply understand how web sites collect and use data about their online interactions. While on the surface many web sites may appear to be served by a single entity, in fact, many web sites are an assembly of multiple parties coming together to power a user's online experience. As an additional privacy tool, this specification provides both the technical and compliance guidelines to enable the online ecosystem to further empower users with the ability to communicate a tracking preferences to a web site and its partners.</p>
+	<p>While there are a variety of business models to monetize content on the web, many rely on advertising. Advertisements can be targeted to a particular user's interests based on information gathered about one's online activity. While the Internet industry believes many users appreciate such targeted advertising, as well as other personalized content, there is also an understanding that some people find the practice intrusive. If this opinion becomes widespread, it could undermine the trust necessary to conduct business on the Internet. This Compliance specification and a companion [[!TRACKING-DNT]] specification are intended to give users a means to indicate their tracking preference and to spell out the obligations of compliant websites that receive the Do Not Track message. The goal is to provide the user with choice, while allowing practices necessary for a smoothly functioning Internet. This should be a win-win for business and consumers alike. The Internet brings millions of users and web sites together in a vibrant and rich ecosystem. As the sophistication of the Internet has grown, so too has its complexity which leaves all but the most technically savvy unable to deeply understand how web sites collect and use data about their online interactions. While on the surface many web sites may appear to be served by a single entity, in fact, many web sites are an assembly of multiple parties coming together to power a user's online experience. As an additional privacy tool, this specification provides both the technical and compliance guidelines to enable the online ecosystem to further empower users with the ability to communicate a tracking preferences to a web site and its partners.</p>
 	<p>The accompanying <a href="http://www.w3.org/2011/tracking-protection/drafts/tracking-compliance.html#bib-TRACKING-DNT">TRACKING-DNT</a> recommendation explains how a user, through a user agent, can clearly express a desire not to be tracked. This Tracking Compliance and Scope recommendation sets the standard for the obligations of a website that receives such a DNT message.</p>
 	<p>Taken together these two standards should have four substantial outcomes:</p><ol start="1"><li>Empower users  to manage their preference around the collection and correlation of data about Internet activities that occur on different sites and spell out the obligations of sites in honoring those preferences when DNT is enabled.</li><li>Provide an exceedingly straightforward way for users to gain transparency and control over data usage and the personalization of content and advertising on the web.</li><li>Enable a vibrant Internet to continue to flourish economically by supporting innovative business models while protecting users' privacy.</li><li>Establish compliance metrics for operators of online services</li></ol><p>This solution is intended to be persistent, technology neutral, and reversible by the user. It aims to preserve a vibrant online ecosystem, privacy-preserving secondary data uses necessary to ecommerce, and adequate security measures. We seek a solution that is persistent, technology neutral, and [something that speaks with the ability to opt back in], but that preserves a vibrant online ecosystem, privacy-preserving secondary data uses, and adequate security measures.</p>
 </section>
@@ -688,7 +688,7 @@
 
 <section id="user-agent-compliance">
 <h3>User Agent Compliance</h3>
-<p>A user agent MUST offer a control to express a tracking preference to third parties.  The control MUST communicate the user's preference in accordance with the [[!!TRACKING-DNT]] recommendation and otherwise comply with that recommendation.  A user agent MUST NOT express a tracking preference for a user unless the user has given express and informed consent to indicate a tracking preference.</p>
+<p>A user agent MUST offer a control to express a tracking preference to third parties.  The control MUST communicate the user's preference in accordance with the [[!TRACKING-DNT]] recommendation and otherwise comply with that recommendation.  A user agent MUST NOT express a tracking preference for a user unless the user has given express and informed consent to indicate a tracking preference.</p>
 <p>We do not specify how tracking preference choices are offered to the user or how the preference is enabled: each implementation is responsible for determining the user experience by which a tracking preference is enabled. For example, a user might select a check-box in their user agent's configuration, install an extension or add-on that is specifically designed to add a tracking preference expression, or make a choice for privacy that then implicitly includes a tracking preference (e.g., "Privacy settings: high"). Likewise, a user might install or configure a proxy to add the expression to their own outgoing requests.</p>
 <p class="option">Shane's proposal has suggested the additional compliance requirements of user agents:<br />1. The User Agent must also make available via a link in explanatory text where DNT is enabled to provide more detailed information about DNT functionality<br />2. Any User Agent claiming compliance must have a functional implementation of the browser exceptions in this specification</p>
 </section>
@@ -918,7 +918,7 @@
 <h2>User-Granted Exceptions</h2>
 <p class="note">Figure out which parts of UGE belong in which document.</p>
 
-<p>The operator of a website may engage in practices otherwise described by this standard if the user has given explicit and informed consent. This consent may be obtained through the browser API defined in the companion [[!!TRACKING-DNT]] document, or an operator of a website may also obtain "out-of-band" consent to disregard a "Do Not Track" preference using a different technology. If an operator is relying on "out of band" consent to disregard a "Do Not Track" instruction, the operator must indicate this consent to the user agrent as described in the companion [[!!TRACKING-DNT]] document.</p>
+<p>The operator of a website may engage in practices otherwise described by this standard if the user has given explicit and informed consent. This consent may be obtained through the browser API defined in the companion [[!TRACKING-DNT]] document, or an operator of a website may also obtain "out-of-band" consent to disregard a "Do Not Track" preference using a different technology. If an operator is relying on "out of band" consent to disregard a "Do Not Track" instruction, the operator must indicate this consent to the user agent as described in the companion [[!TRACKING-DNT]] document.</p>
 
 <!--
 <p class="issue" data-number="83" title="How do you opt out if already opted in? - pretty sure this belongs in the technical spec"></p>
@@ -953,7 +953,7 @@
 <p class="note">this section is the topic of active debate.</p>
 
 <p class=option>Third parties MUST NOT disregard DNT:1 headers whose syntax is correctly formed even if the third party does not believe that the DNT:1 header was set with the explicit and informed consent of the user.</p>
-<p class=option>If the operator of a third-party domain has a good faith belief that a user agent is sending a DNT:1 without the explicit and informed consent of the user, the operator MAY disregard the DNT:1 header and collect, use, and retain information about the user as if no DNT signal had been sent.  If the operator disregards the DNT signal, the operator MUST signal to the user agent that it is disregarding the header as described in the companion [[!!DNT-TRACKING]] document.</p>
+<p class=option>If the operator of a third-party domain has a good faith belief that a user agent is sending a DNT:1 without the explicit and informed consent of the user, the operator MAY disregard the DNT:1 header and collect, use, and retain information about the user as if no DNT signal had been sent.  If the operator disregards the DNT signal, the operator MUST signal to the user agent that it is disregarding the header as described in the companion [[!TRACKING-DNT]] document.</p>
 <p class=option>No provision on Disregarding Non-Compliant User Agents.</p></section>
 
 <section id="degrade">
Received on Friday, 17 August 2012 19:27:42 GMT

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