W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-sweo-ig@w3.org > April 2007

Re: comments on the SW FAQ

From: Kingsley Idehen <kidehen@openlinksw.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Apr 2007 16:05:08 -0400
Message-ID: <462679F4.5020107@openlinksw.com>
CC: public-sweo-ig@w3.org

Ivan Herman wrote:
> Wing C Yung wrote:
>   
>> Ivan, here are some long-overdue comments on the FAQ.
>>
>>     
>>>> Q: What are the major building blocks of the Semantic Web?
>>>>
>>>> We think that it would be good to mention (and link to) the specific
>>>> technology standards in this answer.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>         
>>> Let us discuss that. When I wrote this, I tried to avoid diving into to
>>> too much technical details on this answer. There are other sections
>>> where more specific links are added, but I tried to keep to stay in
>>> generality at that point. What do you think?
>>>       
>> We think it would be good to mention the names of the technologies so that
>> readers have something to search for when they go to do more research. We
>> agree that the description should be high-level and not too technically
>> detailed.
>>
>>     
>
> O.k. I will add just the acronyms of the relevant specs at the end of
> the bulleted items.
>
>   
>>>> Similarly, we'd like to see a question that notes that Semantic Web
>>>> technologies are useful outside of the Web. The very first question
>>>>         
>> hints
>>     
>>>> at this when it talks about data integration, etc., but since a
>>>>         
>> tremendous
>>     
>>>> amount of early adoption is in enterprises and not necessarily on the
>>>>         
>> Web,
>>     
>>>> we think it would be good to acknowledge this...
>>>>
>>>>         
>>> That is controversial, I am not sure how to formulate this. Lots of
>>> people would consider that a 'misuse' of the SW technologies, because
>>> the 'Web' aspect is missing. Can you help writing this down somehow?
>>>       
>> Thoughts on the following?
>>
>> Q: Is it possible to use Semantic Web technologies outside of a Web
>> application?
>>
>> A: Yes, the Semantic Web standards can be used to model, query, and reason
>> with data for any application, not just Web applications. Non-Web
>> applications can still enjoy the benefits of the Semantic Web because they
>> can use the simple and expressive data model, leverage existing tools and
>> libraries, and share and merge data more easily when the need arises. Even
>> non-Web applications, however, should pay close attention to the URIs that
>> are assigned to resources in the data; depending on the nature of the data
>> developers should consider ensuring the resolvability of the URIs.
>>
>>     
>
> Hm. I think that some more thing should be added, I do not really know
> how to formulate it (maybe you could have a go). The point is that a
> number of features of SW techs were defined *with the Web in mind* (Open
> World is a typical case). The same holds for the tools developed for the
> SW. If somebody uses these for internal applications, so to say, that is
> fine, but this should be kept in mind somehow...
>
>
>
>
>   
If you give everything a URI/IRI then you are truly a click away from 
the old: Information at your fingertips vision :-) Actually, in the case 
of the Semantic Web we go one further: Knowledge at your finger tips!

A URI for Customers, Support Cases, Bug, Products, Operating Systems, 
Employees, Competitors, and anything else that your domain of reference 
seeks to unveil :-)

You should be able to click an email address and determine that the mail 
sender is a Prospect, Customer, Partner, or Competitor for instance. 
This simply means RDF  instance data for eCRM systems.

Semantic Web technologies used outside the Web facilitate the generation 
of URI/IRIs for every relevant item of data in a given domain.

-- 


Regards,

Kingsley Idehen	      Weblog: http://www.openlinksw.com/blog/~kidehen
President & CEO 
OpenLink Software     Web: http://www.openlinksw.com
Received on Wednesday, 18 April 2007 20:05:12 GMT

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