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Popular misconceptions - how much cake?

From: Danny Ayers <danny.ayers@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 8 Nov 2006 17:40:56 +0100
Message-ID: <1f2ed5cd0611080840r12bb7d12h179856d39e3c5070@mail.gmail.com>
To: public-sweo-ig@w3.org

[I appear to be able to post to the list, yet can only view it via the
archives - is this intentional?]

I think Jeff's on the nail raising the question of myths, many are
persistent and not easy to refute*.

On Steve's response re. ontologies not necessarily being a requirement
(noting Jeff's Devil's advocacy), consider the following:

[[
To design a website you need to know about HTTP, XHTML, and URIs.

To design a web application you need to know about HTTP, XHTML, and URIs.

To design a web service you need to know about XML, SOAP, WSDL, UDDI,
WS-Policy, WS-Security, WS-Eventing, WS-Reliability, WS-Coordination,
WS-Transaction, WS-Notification, WS-BaseNotification, WS-Topics,
WS-Transfer...
]]
from http://www.crummy.com/writing/REST-Web-Services/

So which sounds better in terms of outreach:

a) To design a Semantic Web application you need to know about HTTP,
RDF, SPARQL and URIs.

b) To design a Semantic Web application you need to know about HTTP,
RDF, SPARQL, XML, Turtle, N3, RDFa, GRDDL, OWL, DLs, MT, Proof,
OWL-S/WSMO, WSDL, RIF, DSig,  and URIs.

Cheers,
Danny.

*My personal favourite misconception came from Dare Obasanjo. He
pointed to the problem of determining that two different dated RSS
feed items appeared on the same day - one from RSS 1.0 (W3CDTF, e.g.
<dc:date>2000-01-01T12:00+00:00,/dc:date>) and one from RSS 2.0 (RFC
822, e.g. <pubDate>Sun, 19 May 2002 15:21:36 GMT</pubDate>). Dare's
argument was that if RDF offered no way of doing that, how much use
could it be for any more complicated data integration problems?

-- 

http://dannyayers.com
Received on Wednesday, 8 November 2006 16:41:10 GMT

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