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Re: overflow issue with CSS and SVG specs

From: Maciej Stachowiak <mjs@apple.com>
Date: Thu, 18 Sep 2008 01:12:50 -0700
To: Doug Schepers <schepers@w3.org>
Cc: David Hyatt <hyatt@apple.com>, CSS WG <w3c-css-wg@w3.org>, w3c-svg-wg@w3.org
Message-id: <5DDD99A8-3113-416F-B492-0BD7DB1E5DEF@apple.com>


On Sep 17, 2008, at 11:14 PM, Doug Schepers wrote:

>
> Actually, because panning and scrolling have such different use cases,
> I'd quite like CSS2.1 (or SVG?) to add the value 'pan' to the list of
> values for 'overflow':
> "This value indicates that the content is clipped and that if the user
> agent provides a panning mechanism (such as pan arrows or a dragging
> cursor), that mechanism should be displayed for a box when its content
> is clipped.  A visible indication of the ability to pan, including the
> directional options available (e.g., arrows indicating that there is
> additional content to the left, right, and down, but none to the top),
> may be presented at all times, or only when the user is interacting  
> with
> the content.  When this value is specified and the target medium is
> 'print', overflowing content may be printed. "

Panning and scrolling are just different user interfaces to the same  
operation. Consider:

- Many applications provide a "panning" interface with a hand cursor  
or the like for content that is also scrollable. For example, Apple's  
"Preview" application does this. It is also popular on Windows  
browsers to allow use of the middle button to pan areas that are  
otherwise scrollable.

- On iPhone, all scrolling is panning. You don't even have the option  
of using the transient scrollbar instead (but nontheless hover  
scrollbars are displayed while panning).

Regards,
Maciej
Received on Monday, 22 September 2008 20:59:20 GMT

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