W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-sml@w3.org > October 2007

[Bug 4656] Restrict XPointer for SML implementations on top of relational databases?

From: <bugzilla@wiggum.w3.org>
Date: Mon, 08 Oct 2007 00:03:14 +0000
CC:
To: public-sml@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1Ieg5a-0007T8-3j@wiggum.w3.org>

http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=4656





------- Comment #5 from virginia.smith@hp.com  2007-10-08 00:03 -------
Per Action 130, the following is a proposal for rewording the SML spec. (This
bug does not address the SML-IF spec and, therefore, neither does the following
proposal.)

=================
There 2 issues for the sml spec per our meeting conversation. 

1. Does the definition of a reference, as stated, require support for access to
non-root elements?
2. Are user-defined reference schemes required to support "fragment
identifies", i.e., access to non-root elements?

The answer to both questions is "no" but some feel the spec is not clear enough
on this.

PROPOSAL: 

1. Change definition of reference (4.1, para. 3) FROM:
An SML reference is a link from one element in an SML model to another element
from the same model. It can be represented by using a variety of schemes, such
as 4.2.1 URI Scheme and Endpoint References (EPRs) [WS-Addressing Core]. SML
does not mandate the use of any specific scheme for representing references;
implementations are free to choose suitable schemes for representing
references.  References MUST be supported by model validators that conform to
this specification. An SML reference MAY use one or more reference schemes.

TO:

An SML reference is a link from one element in an SML model to another element
in the same model. SML references can be represented by using a variety of
schemes, such as 4.2.1 URI Scheme and Endpoint References (EPRs) [WS-Addressing
Core]. It is not required that all elements in an SML model be reachable via an
SML reference. This will depend on the capabilities of the chosen reference
scheme. SML does not mandate the use of any specific scheme for representing
references; implementations are free to choose suitable schemes for
representing references.  However, references MUST be supported by model
validators that conform to this specification. An SML reference MAY use one or
more reference schemes.

2. Change definition of reference scheme (4.2, para. 1) FROM:
A reference MAY be represented by using a variety of schemes, and SML does not
mandate the use of any specific schemes. A reference scheme normally uses, but
is not required to use, child elements, attributes or both to capture the
information necessary to identify a resource. 4.2.1 URI Scheme and endpoint
references (EPRs) [WS-Addressing Core] are two common schemes for referencing
resources. Although SML does not require the use of either scheme, it does
define how a reference MUST be represented using the URI scheme and the EPR
scheme.

TO:

An SML reference MUST be represented by at least one reference scheme. An SML
reference MAY be represented by multiple schemes. SML does not mandate the use
of any specific reference scheme. 

A reference scheme MUST resolve to an element in the SML model but support for
non-root elements is OPTIONAL. In order to capture the information necessary to
identify the targeted element, a reference scheme MAY use, but is not required
to use, the following:
-  child elements or attributes, or both.
-  a fragment identifier, or other semantically similar construct, that enables
the reference to resolve to a non-root element of an instance document. 

The URI Scheme and endpoint references (EPRs) [WS-Addressing Core] are two
common schemes for referencing resources. Although SML does not require the use
of either scheme, it does define how a reference MUST be represented when using
the URI scheme or the EPR scheme.
Received on Monday, 8 October 2007 00:03:27 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Tuesday, 6 January 2015 20:56:06 UTC