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Re: Cross Language with topic maps [was Re: 答复: KB note]

From: Xiaoshu Wang <wangxiao@musc.edu>
Date: Thu, 29 May 2008 00:00:04 +0100
Message-ID: <483DE3F4.4070407@musc.edu>
CC: w3c semweb hcls <public-semweb-lifesci@w3.org>



Kei Cheung wrote:
>
> Hi Eric et al,
>
> I'm glad that umls, topic map, ... were mentioned. We have to do more 
> than literal translation or linguistics. It's semantics!
>
> Traditional Chinese medicine embodies rich dialectical thought, such 
> as that of the holistic connections and the unity of yin and yang. It 
> deals with many facets of human anatomy and physiology: 臟腑 zang-fu 
> (organs), 穴 meridians (main and collateral channels), 氣 qi (vital 
> energy), 血 blood, *靜 *jing (essence of life), body fluid, the inside 
> and outside of the body, as well as the connections between the whole 
> and the parts.
>
> I wonder if there is a Chinese counterpart of umls that have semantic 
> correspondence to the English umls. Topic map is also interesting. I 
> also wonder if there is a direct mapping between topic map and 
> semantic web (rdf/owl) ....
Yes, I can understand this.  But Chinese medicine is built upon a 
complete different conceptual framework.  Of course, there is a need to 
connect Chinese medicine with Western medicine. But I don't think this a 
cross-language issue.  I am from China and I know merging the two 
theories isn't an easy problem - if any possible.

Xiaoshu

>
> I agree that we should narrow the scope of our problem a little bit. 
> Otherwise, things tend to fall apart if we try to be too ambitious. I 
> hope we can start thinking more about this Huperzine use case, for 
> example. I also hope such a use case is holistic in the sense that it 
> is both scientifically and technologically interesting.
>
> Thanks,
>
> -Kei
>
> eric neumann wrote:
>> Why not simply use to following trick on top of universal symbols?
>>
>> <umls:male rdfs:label="male" lang="en"
>> rdfs:label="Mann" lang="ge"
>> rdfs:label="mâle" lang="fr"
>> rdfs:label="男性" lang="zh-Hans"
>> ...
>> >
>>
>> Eric
>>
>> 2008/5/28 Jack Park <jack.park@sri.com <mailto:jack.park@sri.com>>:
>>
>>
>>     In cross-language data integration, it may be a simple matter of
>>     using a
>>     multitude of language-scoped labels in an ontology. Another approach
>>     that has been mentioned on this list many moons back by the late 
>> Bill
>>     Bugg was that of applying topic maps to the federation of
>>     heterogeneous
>>     resources, including disparate ontologies that don't easily 
>> merge, and
>>     data sets. Bill was referring to some of my work. Topic maps
>>     provide the
>>     ability to apply as many different names to some entity as
>>     necessary for
>>     all participants to successfully locate what they seek. At the same
>>     time, topic maps can federate each entity with external comments,
>>     dialogues (such as this email message), bookmarks (tags) and
>>     relationships with other entities.
>>
>>     Jack
>>
>>     Xiaoshu Wang wrote:
>>     > Huajun Chen@Zhejiang University wrote:
>>     >> Another challenge is cross-language data integration, which is
>>     actually a
>>     >> job that ontology should do.
>>     >>
>>     > I honestly disagree. Ontology is about the semantics of *being*
>>     but that
>>     > of symbols. It doesn't matter if how "gene" is called, named, or
>>     > written. It symbolize the same objective entities. A URI such as
>>     > http://www.example.com is not written in English. It is just a
>>     bunch of
>>     > symbols. Let's not introduce linguistic issues into data
>>     integration,
>>     > which already have a lot of issues.
>>     >
>>     > Xiaoshu Wang
>>     >> Best wishes, huajun
>>     >>
>>     >> -----邮件原件-----
>>     >> 发件人: public-semweb-lifesci-request@w3.org
>>     <mailto:public-semweb-lifesci-request@w3.org>
>>     >> [mailto:public-semweb-lifesci-request@w3.org
>>     <mailto:public-semweb-lifesci-request@w3.org>] 代表 Matthias Samwald
>>     >> 发送时间: 2008年5月26日 21:22
>>     >> 收件人: kc28@email.med.yale.edu
>>     <mailto:kc28@email.med.yale.edu>; Tim Clark
>>     >> 抄送: M. Scott Marshall; public-semweb-lifesci@w3.org
>>     <mailto:public-semweb-lifesci@w3.org>
>>     >> 主题: Re: KB note
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >>> Speaking of national boundaries, I wonder if alternative
>>     medicine (e.g.,
>>     >>> herbal
>>     >>> medicine) would also be of interest to this community. For
>>     example,
>>     >>> Huperzine
>>     >>> is a drug derived from the herb Huperzia serrata. I also
>>     wonder if there
>>     >>> are
>>     >>> hypotheses regarding the study of herbs in the possible
>>     treatment of
>>     >>> neurological diseases.
>>     >>>
>>     >> I would also be very motivated to help in this kind of research.
>>     >> Specifically, Huperzine A would be a very interesting use-case
>>     for our
>>     >> developments. It is a herbal compound with a history in folk
>>     medicine and is
>>     >>
>>     >> available OTC in most countries, yet it rivals the 
>> effectiveness of
>>     >> currently leading Alzheimer medications such as Tacrine. It
>>     also has a dual
>>     >> mode of action that does not only involve acetylcholinesterase
>>     inhibition,
>>     >> but also modulation of the NMDA receptor. The implications of
>>     this for the
>>     >> treatment of Alzheimer's are still a rather hot topic.
>>     >>
>>     >> The integration of knowledge from traditional medicine, plant
>>     >> taxonomy/phylogeny/biochemistry and receptor binding databases
>>     (PDSP Ki
>>     >> database, IUPHAR) could lead to the identification of some
>>     extremely novel
>>     >> therapeutic strategies. Finding candidate molecules in such a
>>     way might be
>>     >> much more effective than weeding through libraries of compounds
>>     generated by
>>     >>
>>     >> combinatorial synthesis etc. The challenge lies in the
>>     integration of some
>>     >> very heterogenous datasets that come from vastly different
>>     disciplines,
>>     >> which is exactly the field of research where Semantic Web
>>     technologies are
>>     >> most effective.
>>     >>
>>     >> I guess the major problem for this kind of research is that
>>     there are no
>>     >> funding programmes that span China, the US and Asia...
>>     >>
>>     >> Cheers,
>>     >> Matthias Samwald
>>     >>
>>     >> DERI Galway, Ireland // Semantic Web Company, Austria
>>     >> http://www.deri.ie/
>>     >> http://www.semantic-web.at/
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>     >>
>>
>>
>>
>
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Received on Wednesday, 28 May 2008 23:01:06 UTC

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