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[Bug 12248] Make objects first-class API citizens

From: <bugzilla@jessica.w3.org>
Date: Tue, 08 Mar 2011 03:25:29 +0000
To: public-script-coord@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1PwnY9-0004Oq-8g@jessica.w3.org>
http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=12248

--- Comment #13 from Brendan Eich <brendan@mozilla.org> 2011-03-08 03:25:27 UTC ---
(In reply to comment #12)
> No, it's an attempt to avoid creating unspecifiable ratholes.

Boris, I sense hostility. What's up?

No spec is complete. You know that. Economic law still applies. We do not
specify everything, completely. Allen already observed that structured cloning
is underspecified.

The rathole is in the minds of spec writers and compleatists here. I write this
with no bad feelings. It's not a problem in practice for implementors or web
developers, so long as the [[Get]] internal operations used to access "keyword
parameters" are done before any other steps in the given method's spec, and in
a fixed order.

Please respond to this without changing the subject to runaway recursion or
other iloop equivalents. This was the first objection: that getters could have
effects that would undermine the spec's integrity. I don't think it's true if
you do what ES5 does. The integrity problem is solvable.

The "availability problem" is harder, and it need not be specified. Indeed it
is not, to my knowledge. E.g. Gecko has limits on iframe nesting, not matching
any spec, and sometimes biting (e.g. WebSphere) content. This is not a
real-world high priority, or even a rathole with implementors or developers.

/be

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Received on Tuesday, 8 March 2011 03:25:30 UTC

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