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Re: Conflicts between W3C specs and ES5?

From: Brendan Eich <brendan@mozilla.org>
Date: Mon, 16 Nov 2009 07:56:14 -0800
Cc: "James Graham" <jgraham@opera.com>, "Mark S. Miller" <erights@google.com>, public-script-coord@w3.org
Message-Id: <87BE8626-33F1-4A4D-B3F7-AE75409AEE1F@mozilla.org>
To: "Anne van Kesteren" <annevk@opera.com>
On Nov 16, 2009, at 7:51 AM, Anne van Kesteren wrote:

> On Mon, 16 Nov 2009 16:27:14 +0100, Brendan Eich  
> <brendan@mozilla.org> wrote:
>> Mozilla turns some bugs into Technology Evangelism bugs instead of  
>> slavishly implementing every IE-compatible mistake we can find.

Or Netscape-compatible, which means my fault for JS junk, so I'm not  
lamenting mistakes per se (well, apart from mine). Rather the trailing- 
edge focus plus over-specification.


>> Yes, this is imperfect and we are obviously also guilty of  
>> following extant content instead of leading it. But too much  
>> following, and too much over-specifying, and you will paint  
>> yourself into a corner.
>>
>> The opportunity cost (that you spend time on trailing edge stuff  
>> instead of better leading edge work) is very high too.
>
> Opera has similar evangelism efforts and I'm sure other browser  
> teams do too (at the very least Microsoft does). At some point you  
> just reach the point where spending some time on defining trailing  
> edge stuff outweighs the cost of trying to evangelize each site that  
> uses it.

At some point *you* do. So do we, but less so since gaining more  
market share starting with Firefox 1 in 2004. Back in 2001 we would  
either do what we had to, or wave the standards flag and hang tough at  
small-percentage market share numbers.

Market dynamics and content evolution mean that the trailing edge  
trails off -- the '90s web does not entirely render compatibly in an  
HTML5 UA. We should not over-bias for the past, or we will paint  
ourselves (slowly) into corners.

/be
Received on Monday, 16 November 2009 15:57:57 UTC

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