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Re: RIF-in-RDF: Requirement 4

From: Sandro Hawke <sandro@w3.org>
Date: Sun, 25 Jul 2010 18:59:04 -0400
To: Dave Reynolds <dave.e.reynolds@gmail.com>
Cc: public-rif-wg <public-rif-wg@w3.org>
Message-ID: <1280098744.1863.190.camel@waldron>
On Sun, 2010-07-25 at 23:16 +0100, Dave Reynolds wrote:
> Hi Sandro,
> 
> Thanks for the detailed description.
> 
> First, note that I very much agree about the value of RIF for vocabulary
> translation - I seem to recall proposing & drafting the original
> vocabulary translation example for the requirements document :)
> 
> Second, I agree that RIF can be used to transform RIF. Though that's a
> less compelling case because the RIF syntax is so verbose. In practice I
> would expect to translate RIF rules to/from a compact, normalized
> abstract syntax form and perform transformations on that abstract syntax
> - using RIF. 
> 
> Now, turning to your example ...
> 
> > Let's try (1) first, since it's more terse.  Our input looks like
> > this:
> > 
> >       ...
> >       <if>       <!-- or something else that can have an And in it -->
> >          <my:Conjunction>
> >              <my:conjunct>$1</my:conjunct>
> >              <my:conjunct>$2</my:conjunct>
> >              ...
> >          </my:Conjunction>
> >       </if>
> >       ...
> > 
> > and we'll just "replace" the element names.
> > 
> > However, since we don't have a way to "replace" things in this
> > "overlapping" style, we'll just add a second <if> property, and the
> > serializer or consumer will discard this one, since it contains an
> > element not allowed by the dialect syntax.   
> > 
> > So, the rule will add new triples, but leave the old ones intact.
> > The rule will leave us with this:
> > 
> > 
> >       ...
> >       <if>       <!-- or something else that can have an And in it -->
> >          <my:Conjunction>
> >              <my:conjunct>$1</my:conjunct>
> >              <my:conjunct>$2</my:conjunct>
> >              ...
> >          </my:Conjunction>
> >       </if>
> >       <if>      <!-- the same property, whatever it was -->
> >          <And>
> >              <formula>$1</formula>
> >              <formula>$2</formula>
> >              ...
> >          </And>
> >       </if>
> >       ...
> > 
> > Here's the rule:
> > 
> >  forall ?parent ?prop ?old ?conjunct ?new
> >  if And( 
> >    ?parent[?prop->?old]
> >    my:Conjunction#?old[my:conjunct->?conjunct]
> >    ?new = wrapped(?old)  <!-- use a logic function to create a new node -->
> >  ) then And (
> >    ?parent[?prop->?new]
> >    rif:And#?new[rif:formula->?conjunct]
> >  )
> > 
> > This works fine, as long as the reasoning is complete.  However, if
> > the reasoning is ever incomplete, we end up with undetectably
> > incorrect results.  Rules that were "if and(a b c) then d" might get
> > turned into "if and(a b) then d"!   
> > 
> > I don't think it's sensible to expect reasoners to be complete.  It's
> > great to have termination conditions arise from the rules; it's not
> > good to require the reasoner to run until it knows all possible
> > inferences have been made.  With the above approach, there's no
> > termination condition other than "make all the inferences possible".
> 
> Here we differ.
> 
> There is a difference between completeness, termination and premature
> termination. You seem to be wanting robustness against the latter and I
> don't think that is either possible or desirable.
> 
> A rule system (or indeed other proof procedure) may reliably terminate
> but still be incomplete.
> 
> To me any admissible vocabulary transformation rule set has to be
> terminating (reaches a (fixed) point where no new derivations are
> possible). If you run a transformation rule set and it doesn't terminate
> within the resources you can devote to it then you can do nothing with
> the result. There is no reason to expect an aborted transformation to be
> well-formed or usable. That's the nature of such transformations.
> 
> > Alternatively, if we use the list encoding, the rule is very similar:
> > 
> >  forall ?parent ?prop ?old ?conjuncts ?new
> >  if And( 
> >    ?parent[?prop->?old]
> >    my:Conjunction#?old[my:conjuncts->?conjuncts]
> >    ?new = wrapped(?old)
> >  ) then And (
> >    ?parent[?prop->?new]
> >    rif:And#?new[rif:formulas->?conjuncts]
> >  )
> 
> That is an accident of this example. I can easily imagine more complex
> transformations needing e.g. to recursively walk the list constructing a
> new transformed list. Imaging a transformation to reverse the terms in
> the AND for example, which didn't use the DTB built-in. If you abort
> such a rule set part way then you will get an incomplete transformation,
> it may even look like a well-formed list but it will be missing values.

I don't think that's the case.   As I mentioned in my message a minute
ago to Michael, I'm thinking about this via backward chaining not
forward chaining, and perhaps that's leading us to different
conclusions.

What I'm used to from Prolog is having rules which generate many correct
results.   (in this case, each correct result is a transformation of a
rif:Document which is implied by some translation rules.)   You can
abort while it's looking for the first solution, and then you simply
have no result (and you know that).   Or you can get the first solution,
and then decide not to look for any more.  Then you have one result (and
you know it).   You can keep looking as long as you want, getting more
results, or abort when you like.  Eventually, the system may tell you
it's found all the solutions.

With the list-style, each solution is a correct transformation.  With
the repeated-property style, you need to let the system run until it's
found all solutions (and it has to be a complete reasoner).

   -- Sandro

> > ... but now we can set a termination condition: if a RIF document in
> > the desired dialect *can* be extracted, then you're done.
> 
> No, simply replacing repeated properties by lists isn't enough to
> achieve this, see above.
> 
> 
> Hope I'm understanding your example correctly.
> 
> Cheers,
> Dave
> 
> 
> 
Received on Sunday, 25 July 2010 22:59:14 GMT

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