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Re: strawman draft of "RDF Data Layers and Datasets"

From: Guus Schreiber <guus.schreiber@vu.nl>
Date: Wed, 9 May 2012 17:47:43 +0200
Message-ID: <4FAA919F.1010909@vu.nl>
To: Steve Harris <steve.harris@garlik.com>
CC: Sandro Hawke <sandro@w3.org>, public-rdf-wg <public-rdf-wg@w3.org>


On 08-05-2012 19:27, Steve Harris wrote:
> On 2 May 2012, at 07:47, Guus Schreiber wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> On 02-05-2012 15:42, Sandro Hawke wrote:
>>> I took the liberty of moving forward with drafting a possible spec, so
>>> we have something to look at.   Several sections are empty, but I'm
>>> pretty happy with what's there.  The example is that same as on the
>>> "Layers" page on the wiki.
>>
>> Terminology issue (I would by no means want to disturb any arising consensus).
>>
>> I don't think the term "layer" will do the required trick. I cannot but associate it with vertical relations. The term we choose should have both vertical and horizontal connotations.
>
> +1, I've spend too much time using Photoshop and similar tools to be able to get that model out of my head.
>
> The OED definition is pretty clear that it indicated overlapping surfaces, generally with an implied hierarchy:
>
> noun
> 1 a sheet, quantity, or thickness of material, typically one of several, covering a surface or body: bears depend on a layer of blubber to keep them warm in the water | figurative : a larger missile would provide a layer of defense at higher altitudes.
> • a level of seniority in the hierarchy of an organization: a managerial layer.
> 2 [ in combination ] a person or thing that lays something: the worms are prolific egg-layers.
> 3 a shoot fastened down to take root while attached to the parent plant.
>
> verb [ with obj. ] (often as adj. layered)
> 1 arrange in a layer or layers: the current trend for layered clothes.
> • cut (hair) in overlapping layers: her layered, shoulder-length hair.
> 2 propagate (a plant) as a layer: a layered shoot.
> ORIGIN Middle English (denoting a mason): from lay + -er. The sense ‘stratum of material covering a surface’ (early 17th cent.)
>
>>                                                                           I'd prefer "box": boxes can be put next to each other
>> or on top of each other.
>
> Box has connotations of A-Box and T-Box, but otherwise is less confusing than layer.

This connotation only holds for a small subset of the population :-) (of 
course a very clever elite subset).
Guus

>
> - Steve
>
>> Feel free to ignore for the moment.
>>
>> Guus
>>
>>>
>>> http://dvcs.w3.org/hg/rdf/raw-file/default/rdf-layers/index.html
>>>
>>> I have no idea if we'll get to this on the agenda today or not.
>>>
>>>      -- Sandro
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>
Received on Wednesday, 9 May 2012 15:48:17 GMT

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