W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-qt-comments@w3.org > June 2008

[Bug 5705] Catalog003 indicates a problematic test case

From: <bugzilla@wiggum.w3.org>
Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2008 14:28:56 +0000
To: public-qt-comments@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1KBsT2-0003JI-TP@wiggum.w3.org>

http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=5705


Tim Mills <tim@cbcl.co.uk> changed:

           What    |Removed                     |Added
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 CC|                            |tim@cbcl.co.uk




--- Comment #4 from Tim Mills <tim@cbcl.co.uk>  2008-06-26 14:28:56 ---
Sorry, I think foo:// is valid.

Quoting the specification:

hier-part   = "//" authority path-abempty
                  / path-absolute
                  / path-rootless
                  / path-empty

   The scheme and path components are required, though the path may be
   empty (no characters).  When authority is present, the path must
   either be empty or begin with a slash ("/") character.  When
   authority is not present, the path cannot begin with two slash
   characters ("//").  These restrictions result in five different ABNF
   rules for a path (Section 3.3), only one of which will match any
   given URI reference.

   The following are two example URIs and their component parts:

         foo://example.com:8042/over/there?name=ferret#nose
         \_/   \______________/\_________/ \_________/ \__/
          |           |            |            |        |
       scheme     authority       path        query   fragment
          |   _____________________|__
         / \ /                        \
         urn:example:animal:ferret:nose

So this is saying that:


                   path-absolute
                   path-rootless
                   path-empty

may not begin with '//'.

path-abempty can begin with '//' even if the authority is the empty string -
because the authority is still present.  Note that the empty string is a valid
authority (matching the 'reg-name' production).

So foo:// is a valid URI with an empty authority and empty path.  The '//' here
is _not_ part of the path.

Here's what Microsoft's .NET System.Uri class does with this...


$  New-object Uri('foo://')


AbsolutePath   : /
AbsoluteUri    : foo:///
Authority      :
Host           :
HostNameType   : Basic
IsDefaultPort  : True
IsFile         : False
IsLoopback     : True
IsUnc          : False
LocalPath      : /
PathAndQuery   : /
Port           : -1
Query          :
Fragment       :
Scheme         : foo
OriginalString : foo://
DnsSafeHost    :
IsAbsoluteUri  : True
Segments       : {/}
UserEscaped    : False
UserInfo       :


-- 
Configure bugmail: http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/userprefs.cgi?tab=email
------- You are receiving this mail because: -------
You are the QA contact for the bug.
Received on Thursday, 26 June 2008 14:29:30 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Tuesday, 27 March 2012 18:14:52 GMT