W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-lod@w3.org > January 2013

Re: Linked Data Dogfood circa. 2013

From: Melvin Carvalho <melvincarvalho@gmail.com>
Date: Sat, 5 Jan 2013 00:24:04 +0100
Message-ID: <CAKaEYhJ2CL0+hLZ1_1QU3Uzs=9SJmkcErbx-gtm2JHotq_2C5w@mail.gmail.com>
To: Kingsley Idehen <kidehen@openlinksw.com>
Cc: public-lod@w3.org
On 5 January 2013 00:14, Kingsley Idehen <kidehen@openlinksw.com> wrote:

> On 1/4/13 4:02 PM, Giovanni Tummarello wrote:
>
>> One might just simply stay silent and move along, but i take a few
>> seconds to restate the obvious.
>>
>> It is a fact that Linked data as " publish some stuff and they will
>> come, both new publishers and consumers" has failed.
>>
>
> Of course it hasn't. How have we (this community) arrived at a LOD Cloud
> way in excess of 50 Billion+ useful triples? I just can't accept this kind
> of dismissal, it has adverse effects on the hard work of many that are
> continuously contributing to the LOD Cloud effort.
>
>
>
>> The idea of putting some "extra energy" would simply be useless per se
>> BUT it becomes  wrong when one tries to involve others e.g. gullible
>> newcomers,  fresh ph.d students who trust that "hey if my ph.d advisor
>> made a career out of it, and EU gave him so much money it must be real
>> right?"
>>
>
> Teach people how to make little bits of Linked Data in Turtle. The RDBMS
> world successfully taught people how to make Tables and execute simple
> queries using SQL, in the ultimate data silos i.e., RDBMS engines. The same
> rules apply here with the advantage of a much more powerful, open, and
> ultimately useful language in SPARQL. In addition to that, you have a
> superior data source name (DSN) mechanism in HTTP URIs, and superior Data
> Access that's all baked into HTTP.
>
> Last year I ensured every employee at OpenLink could write Turtle by hand.
> They all performed a basic exercise [1][2]: describe the yourself and/or
> stuff you like. The process started slow and ended with everyone having a
> lot of fun.
>
> Simple message to get folks to engage: if you know illiteracy leads to
> competitive disadvantage in the physical (real) world, why accept
> illiteracy in the ultra competitive digital realm of the Web? Basically, if
> you can write simple sentences in natural language, why not learn to do the
> same with the Web realm in mind?  Why take the distracting journey of
> producing an HTML file when you can dump content such as what follows into
> a file?
>
> ## Turtle Start ##
>
> <> a <#Document> .
> <> <#topic> <#i> .
> <#i> <#name> "Kingsley Idehen" .
> <#i> <#nickname> "@kidehen" .
>
> ## Bonus bits: Cross References to properties defined by existing
> vocabularies
> ## In more serious exercises this section would be where DBpedia and other
> LOD cloud URIs kick-in.
>
> <#name> owl:equivalentProperty foaf:name .
> <#topic> owl:equivalentProperty foaf:topic .
> <#nickname> owl:equivalentClass foaf:nick .
> <#Document> owl:equivalentClass foaf:Document .
> <#i> owl:sameAs <http://kingsley.idehen.net/**
> dataspace/person/kidehen#this<http://kingsley.idehen.net/dataspace/person/kidehen#this>>
> .
>
> ## Turtle End ##
>
> Don't underestimate the the power of human intelligence, once awakened :-)
> The above is trivial for any literate person to comprehend. Remember, they
> already understand natural language sentence structure expressed in:
> subject->predicate->object or subject->verb-object form.
>
>
>
>> IAs community of people who claim to have something to do with
>> research (and not a cult) every once in a while is learn from the
>> above lesson and devise NEW methods and strategies.
>>
>
> Yes, and the lesson we've learned over the years is that premature
> optimization is suboptimal when dealing with Linked Data. Basically, you
> have to teach Linked Data using manual document production steps i.e.,
> remind them of the document create and share pattern. Once this is
> achieved, they'll immediately realize there's a lot of fun to being able to
> represent structured data with ease, but at the expense of limited free
> time -- the very point when productivity oriented tools and services come
> into play.


Nice!

There should be official sem web tests, badges and achievements based on
passing things like this.  Described in linked data of course!


>
>
>  In other words,
>> move ahead in a smart way.
>>
>
> Yes, but there isn't one smart way. For we humans the quest is always rife
> with context fluidity. Thus, "horses for courses" rule always applies. No
> silver bullets.
>
>
>
>> I am by no mean trowing all away.
>>
>
> Good!
>
>
>
>> * publishing structured data on the web is already a *huge thing* with
>> schema.org and the rest.
>>
>
> Yes, but that's a useful piece of the picture. Not the picture.
> HTML+Microdata and (X)HTML+RDFa are not for end-users. Turtle is for
> end-users, so it too has to be part of the mix when the target audience is
> end-users.
>
>
>  Why? because of the clear incentive SEO.
>>
>
> SEO is only a piece of the picture. Yes, everyone wants to be discovered
> by Google, for now, but that isn't the Web's ultimate destiny. What people
> really want is serendipitous discovery of relevant information as an
> intrinsic component of the virtuous cycle associated with content sharing
> via the Web.
>
>
>  * RDF is a great model for heterogeneous data integration and i think
>> it will explode in (certain) enterprises (knowledge intensive)
>>
>
> RDF provides specific benefits lost in a warped narrative. It USP boils
> down to endowing entity relationship model based structured data with
> *explicit* and *fine-grained* machine and human comprehensible entity
> relationship semantics. It improves upon the basic entity relationship
> model where entity relationship semantics are *implicit* and
> *coarse-grained*.
>
> The awkward paragraph above has been long understood by a majority of the
> DBMS developers and end-users outside the Semantic Web and Linked Data
> communities. It just gets very confusing once the letters R-D-F come into
> the mix due to the provincial nature of many of its older narratives.
>
> Note: the new work by the RDF working group has solved the issue above
> i.e., they've done an *amazing* job fixing many of the issues that have
> dogged RDF narratives of yore.
>
>
>
>> What we're seeking here is more advanced, flexible uses of structured
>> data published, e.g. by smart clients, that do useful things for
>> people.
>>
>
> Yes, and one simple way to get users engaged is by showing them that they
> can put one or two sentences in a document, publish the document, and start
> follow-your-nose exploration. All at the fraction of the time cost it takes
> to achieve the same thing using HTML.
>
>
>  The key is to show these clients, these useful things. What other
>> (realistic) incentive can we create that make people publish data?
>>
>
> You show them how powerful entity oriented analytics [3] can be performed
> against this data. Basically, Business Intelligence ++ .
>
>
>    how
>> would a real "linked data client" work and provide benefit to a real
>> world, non academic example class of users (if not all?) .
>>
>
> See my comment above, and digest the links I reference. Note, I am not
> speculating, I have customers who are exploiting these patterns right now.
> Teach folks Turtle and you will simplify value proposition articulation and
> appreciation.
>
>
>
>> my wish for 2013 about linked data is that the discussion focuses on
>> this.
>>
>
> Yes, productive use of Linked Data. That doesn't mean we don't dogfood.
> Every demo I make is a dog-fooding exercise.
>
>
>  With people concentrated on the "full circle, round trip"
>> experience, with incentives for all (and how to start the virtuous
>> circle).
>>
>
> We just need to teach people how to publish documents with high
> Serendipitous Discovery Quotient (SDQ) [4], SEO's days are numbered :-)
>
> Links:
>
> 1. http://bit.ly/QlQJLP -- Describing Stuff I Like using a Turtle
> Document.
> 2. http://bit.ly/RJzd9S -- Why Turtle Matters.
> 3. http://bit.ly/VAgjlx -- LOD Cloud Analytics based on Job Postings
> (snapshots) from LinkedIn.
> 4. https://plus.google.com/s/%**23SDQ%20idehen<https://plus.google.com/s/%23SDQ%20idehen>-- SDQ related posts on G+ .
> 5. http://bit.ly/UqyqZa -- LOD Cloud Analytics based on Entity of type:
> Book  (basically an analysis of Worldcat and related data about Books).
> 6. http://bit.ly/RCKbts -- LOD Cloud exploitation via ODBC compliant
> applications (*this is one the enterprises easily understand, they all use
> ODBC or JDBC for RDBMS data access).
> 7. http://bit.ly/QhGBXY -- LOD Cloud exploitation via Google Spreadsheet .
> 8. http://bit.ly/NP8uWv -- LOD Cloud exploitation via Microsoft Excel
> Spreadsheet.
>
>
> Kingsley
>
>
>> Gio
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Jan 4, 2013 at 2:03 PM, William Waites <ww@styx.org> wrote:
>>
>>> hmmm.... not so tasty:
>>>
>>>      warning: array_keys() [function.array-keys]: The first argument
>>> should
>>>      be an array in
>>>      /var/www/drupal-6.22/sites/**all/modules/dogfood/dogfood.**module
>>> on
>>>      line 1807.
>>>
>>> digging deeper:
>>>
>>>      The proxy server received an invalid response from an upstream
>>> server.
>>>      The proxy server could not handle the request POST /sparql.
>>>
>>>      Reason: DNS lookup failure for: data.semanticweb.org
>>>
>>>      Apache/2.2.3 (Debian) DAV/2 SVN/1.4.2 PHP/5.2.0-8+etch16
>>> mod_ssl/2.2.3
>>>      OpenSSL/0.9.8c Server at data.semanticweb.org Port 80
>>>
>>> (appears to be a reverse proxy at data.semanticweb.org)
>>>
>>> I think I prefer people food...
>>>
>>> Cheers,
>>> -w
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
> --
>
> Regards,
>
> Kingsley Idehen
> Founder & CEO
> OpenLink Software
> Company Web: http://www.openlinksw.com
> Personal Weblog: http://www.openlinksw.com/**blog/~kidehen<http://www.openlinksw.com/blog/~kidehen>
> Twitter/Identi.ca handle: @kidehen
> Google+ Profile: https://plus.google.com/**112399767740508618350/about<https://plus.google.com/112399767740508618350/about>
> LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/**kidehen<http://www.linkedin.com/in/kidehen>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Received on Friday, 4 January 2013 23:24:32 UTC

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