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Re: Content negotiation for Turtle files

From: Kingsley Idehen <kidehen@openlinksw.com>
Date: Wed, 06 Feb 2013 14:03:08 -0500
Message-ID: <5112A8EC.2060101@openlinksw.com>
To: public-lod@w3.org
On 2/6/13 1:16 PM, Colin wrote:
> My apologies, I hit the Send button a bit too early.
>
> Please read: "With so much interlinked data you want to browse, not to 
> get Turtle files one by one by manually concatenating the base URIs 
> with the entities names".

You don't have to do any such thing. See:

1. 
http://kingsley.idehen.net/DAV/home/kidehen/Public/AmazonS3/Profile/ThingsILike.ttl 
-- note the use of relative document URLs and how they simplify the 
production of Linked Data URIs .

2. 
http://linkeddata.uriburner.com/about/html/http/kingsley.idehen.net/DAV/home/kidehen/Public/AmazonS3/Profile/ThingsILike.ttl 
-- via Linked Data Browser .

3. 
http://linkeddata.uriburner.com/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fkingsley.idehen.net%2FDAV%2Fhome%2Fkidehen%2FPublic%2FAmazonS3%2FProfile%2FThingsILike.ttl 
-- via Faceted Linked Data Browser .

Re. #2 and #3 Each time you click on a link the entity description 
oriented data is retrieved and presented to you via an HTML document 
that provides clear context for the follow-your-nose pattern that 
underlies Web navigation in general.

Kingsley

>
> Best regards,
> Colin
>
> On Wed, Feb 6, 2013 at 7:08 PM, Colin <colin@zebrana.net 
> <mailto:colin@zebrana.net>> wrote:
>
>     Hi all,
>
>     Fascinating thread, all arguments being quite valid and it seems
>     it all depends on what you want to achieve with Linked data.
>
>     I was about to write a lengthy text to explain my view, but I'll
>     start with a table to save time and improve readibility:
>
>     *You are..*
>
>     	
>
>     *Human*
>
>     	
>
>     *Machine*
>
>     *You want to…*
>
>     *Write data*
>
>     	
>
>     Turtle
>
>     	
>
>     RDF/XML, JSon, Ntriples
>
>     *Read data*
>
>     	
>
>     HTML , /Turtle/
>
>     	
>
>     RDF/XML, JSon, Turtle, Ntriples
>
>
>     *Turtle*: like Kingsley pointed many times, it's easy write at
>     hand. Like Richard pointed, users should use a decent editor, with
>     syntax checking, possibilities to import objects, classes,
>     properties etc.. easily, maybe a preview feature that would show a
>     graphical view of the written graph.
>
>     However, if reading Turtle is possible, I don't think it's what
>     users would like in the end. With a plain Turtle file you get the
>     meaning, but zero usability. With so much interlinked data you
>     want to browse, not to get Turtle files one by one by manually
>     concatenating the . It's like comparing the RFC text files
>     (example <http://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc5646.txt>) with the W3C
>     recommandation pages (example <http://www.w3.org/TR/xquery/>),
>     full of links, or something even more powerful, something like
>     Graphity (my company's data portal <http://data.nxp.com>).
>
>     I can't think of a situation where a machine would write Turtle.
>
>     *RDF/XML*: Not readable by humans. Since XML is quite common to
>     store data, the easiest way to product RDF from XML is to
>     serialize RDF/XML. As pointed earlier, it's so easy that some
>     people produce millions of rubbish triples. But don't blame the
>     tool, crappy data was in MySQL DBs, in XML, and will be in RDF
>     too. Instead of banning or advising against using it, it would be
>     more productive to bring a light on the pitfalls, the most common
>     mistakes that a XML developer would make when producing RDF.
>
>     *JSON*: Not readable by humans. I'm not very familiar with
>     Javascript development. However I know enough to know that
>     providing a JS developer with JSon is a treat, certainly for
>     reading, probably for writing too.
>
>     Best regards, and retro-thanks for all the previous threads!
>
>     Colin Maudry
>     @colinmaudry
>     Product Data Analyst
>     NXP Semiconductors
>
>     On Wed, Feb 6, 2013 at 4:24 PM, Kingsley Idehen
>     <kidehen@openlinksw.com <mailto:kidehen@openlinksw.com>> wrote:
>
>         On 2/6/13 10:00 AM, Richard Light wrote:
>
>             One issue that Turtle will need to address (it may do so
>             already) is software support for free-hand data entry.
>              While the format is seductively simple-looking (well, it
>             is to the likes of us who grew up on XML/SGML*) it is very
>             easy to make mistakes.
>
>             I followed Kingsley's reference to his file space (see his
>             separate reply) and grabbed the file jordan.ttl.
>
>
>         Now, you really have to put my directory listing example in
>         context. This isn't about perfect data (such doesn't exist) it
>         is all about the ability to create and share data. FWIW -- of
>         all the files to pick, you picked the one created by my 12
>         year old son :-)
>
>
>             It contains variations in spelling which will mean that
>             some predicate - subject links will fail (e.g. New England
>             Patriots), as will one sameAs link (USA).
>
>
>         Yes, he is a Pats fan, so I used that to pique his interest en
>         route to teaching him Turtle.
>
>
>             There is (I guess) an intended link from USA to N.
>             America, but again this won't fly because USA's continent
>             property is expressed as a string..  If case matters, most
>             of the sameAs references won't work.  The properties
>             (predicates) are all local to the document and none of
>             them is defined.  Integer values are typed as strings. Two
>             of the dates are wrong (e.g. Sept 31 783). This is not to
>             criticise Kingsley's typing, but rather to point out that
>             if you are encouraging users to hand-type resources which
>             are to be interpreted as data, then they are going to need
>             some software support if they are not going to be mightily
>             let down by the whole process.  It's a bit like authoring
>             web pages: it doesn't go too badly if you're working in a
>             rich edit box and don't have to add HTML markup yourself.
>
>
>         As I said, you somehow you stumbled across the Turtle doc
>         produced by a 12 year old. That file was all about getting him
>         going and then showing him the implications of his mistakes etc..
>
>         My other Turtle tutorials include sample links to profiles
>         documents, stuff I like etc.
>
>
>             Richard
>
>
>
>         -- 
>
>         Regards,
>
>         Kingsley Idehen
>         Founder & CEO
>         OpenLink Software
>         Company Web: http://www.openlinksw.com
>         Personal Weblog: http://www.openlinksw.com/blog/~kidehen
>         <http://www.openlinksw.com/blog/%7Ekidehen>
>         Twitter/Identi.ca handle: @kidehen
>         Google+ Profile:
>         https://plus.google.com/112399767740508618350/about
>         LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kidehen
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


-- 

Regards,

Kingsley Idehen	
Founder & CEO
OpenLink Software
Company Web: http://www.openlinksw.com
Personal Weblog: http://www.openlinksw.com/blog/~kidehen
Twitter/Identi.ca handle: @kidehen
Google+ Profile: https://plus.google.com/112399767740508618350/about
LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kidehen







Received on Wednesday, 6 February 2013 19:03:31 UTC

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