W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-lod@w3.org > September 2012

Re: Describing Stuff You Like using Turtle

From: Nathan <nathan@webr3.org>
Date: Sat, 22 Sep 2012 16:47:34 +0100
Message-ID: <505DDD96.5020201@webr3.org>
To: Kingsley Idehen <kidehen@openlinksw.com>
CC: public-lod@w3.org
Kingsley Idehen wrote:
> On 9/22/12 8:26 AM, Hugh Glaser wrote:
>> Sorry, I realise this is not exactly on topic (which is about crafting 
>> turtle, not specifically about likes), butů
>>
>> It reminds me of some fun we had in 2004.
>> Ah, halcyon days - those balmy times before Linked Data came along.
>> We did a document about it for the 1st (and only? :-) ) FOAF Workshop.
>> http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/265453
>>
>> whatilike.org is still there, but seems to have lost its 3store, which 
>> is not surprising after 8 years and several machine moves.
>> I guess I must have spent a good few bucks keeping the domain alive, 
>> waiting for the time (for one of us) to get back to it.
>>
>> Who knows?
>> Maybe this will prompt someone.
>> Any one?
> 
> Hugh,
> 
> I find this on topic.
> 
> The key point we need to revisit is that triple or quad stores aren't 
> mandatory for endeavors like this. The pattern can be much simpler, and 
> it goes something like this (circa. 2012):
> 
> 1. Signup for storage services via the likes of Dropbox, SkyDrive, 
> Amazon S3 etc.. (left Google Drive, Box.NET off the list because they 
> don't support mime type text/plain) -- you get 2GB free on average these 
> days
> 
> 2. Create a local Turtle document
> 
> 3. Upload it to your service provider's folder (these are automatically 
> part of your local storage setup, post installation, so no manual 
> mounting is required)
> 
> 4. Share you new Linked Data doc with the world
> 
> 5. Linked Data aware user agents take care of the visualization etc..
> 
> All of this is now possible without:
> 
> 1. Domain ownership
> 2. DNS server access and admin control
> 3. Web server access and admin control -- no need for URL re-write rules
> 4. A SPARQL compliant triple or quad store
> 5. HttRange-14 distractions and confusion re. URI disambiguation and 
> patterns .
> 
> It just works.
> 
> When folks realize that they can express their Likes and DisLikes 
> (amongst other things) in simple Linked Data documents over which they 
> possess full access control, the game changes completely. The murkiness 
> around Linked Data comprehension vaporizes.

Has anybody done a quick turtle editor with an xmlHttpRequest upload 
straight to S3 yet? it could make it even easier..

Best,

Nathan

>> On 19 Sep 2012, at 19:44, Kingsley Idehen <kidehen@openlinksw.com> wrote:
>>
>>> All,
>>>
>>> As I've often stated, there's a premature optimization bug in the 
>>> Linked Data narrative. We early adopters concluded -- incorrectly -- 
>>> that nobody would ever need to craft Linked Data documents by hand. 
>>> Of course, a lot of that had to do with RDF/XML and Turtle's 
>>> protracted journey towards W3C recommendation status. Anyway, 
>>> focusing on the present, we have an opportunity to fix the 
>>> aforementioned narrative bug by revisiting the value of crafting 
>>> Linked Data documents by hand.
>>>
>>> I've dropped a simple post showcasing the use of a Turtle document to 
>>> describe some of the things I like [1].
>>>
>>> Why is Turtle important?
>>> People master new concepts by exercise. Crafting Turtle documents by 
>>> hand brings focus back to subject-predicate-object or 
>>> entity-attribute-value concept comprehension, with regards to basic 
>>> sentence structure etc..
>>>
>>> How does it aid Linked Data demystification etc?
>>>
>>> It adds a Do-It-Yourself dimension that boils down to constructing a 
>>> local Turtle document and publishing it to the Web, via a plethora of 
>>> storage services that remove the following hurdles:
>>>
>>> 1. Domain Ownership
>>> 2. DNS Server access and admin level control
>>> 3. HTTP Server access and admin level control
>>> 4. URI pattern issues confusion and distraction.
>>>
>>> Once end-users understand the basics, reinforced by simple exercises, 
>>> it equips them with the foundation and critical context for tools 
>>> appreciation.
>>>
>>> Turtle is very important to Linked Data comprehension. Its a syntax 
>>> that's user profile agnostic, unlike others that ultimately server 
>>> specific programmer profiles:
>>>
>>> 1. Turtle -- everyone
>>> 2. HTML+Microdata -- HTML programmers
>>> 3. (X)HTML+RDFa -- (X)HTML programmers
>>> 4. JSON-LD -- Javascript programmers
>>> 5. RDF/XML -- no comment, but certainly not 1-4 :-)
>>>
>>>
>>> Links:
>>>
>>> 1. http://bit.ly/SBDmXr -- Turtle document describing stuff I like .
>>>
>>> -- 
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>>
>>> Kingsley Idehen   
>>> Founder & CEO
>>> OpenLink Software
>>> Company Web: http://www.openlinksw.com
>>> Personal Weblog: http://www.openlinksw.com/blog/~kidehen
>>> Twitter/Identi.ca handle: @kidehen
>>> Google+ Profile: https://plus.google.com/112399767740508618350/about
>>> LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kidehen
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
> 
> 
Received on Saturday, 22 September 2012 15:48:19 UTC

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