W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-lod@w3.org > March 2011

Re: Design issues 5-star data section tidy up

From: Christopher Gutteridge <cjg@ecs.soton.ac.uk>
Date: Wed, 09 Mar 2011 21:09:08 +0000
Message-ID: <EMEW3|15ee60fe93356e4f438da90cefd5214en28L9A03cjg|ecs.soton.ac.uk|4D77EC74.1030404@ecs.soton.ac.uk>
To: Bill Roberts <bill@swirrl.com>
CC: Linked Data community <public-lod@w3.org>
Can I echo Les Carr's concerns that Excel is a bad example. It's kinda 
Open these days. I can read the data in a free perl library, so why 
isn't that 3*?

Also, I've created some URIs for the concepts should you want to 
describe a dataset conforming to a * ranking;
http://openorg.ecs.soton.ac.uk/wiki/Namespace#Linked_Open_Data

?foo a void:Dataset ;
    dcterms:conformsTo <http://purl.org/openorg/opendata-5-star> .

Use them if they are useful. I'm using the openorg namespace to define 
little bits of glue I've needed to launch our open data site, but were 
reusable so I didn't want to lump them into our "predicates that just 
related very local concepts you'd never want to re-use outside our 
organisation" namespace.

If anybody in the community has missed it, by the way, here's our 
initial offering... with more in the pipe...
http://data.southampton.ac.uk/datasets.html

On 09/03/11 20:46, Bill Roberts wrote:
> I like the new(ish) addition to http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/LinkedData.html on 5-star data.  Unfortunately it looks like TimBL typed it with his eyes shut :-)
>
> Since it's a much read and much referenced document, I'd like to offer the following version with typos corrected.  Perhaps someone with permission to edit this page might want to copy and paste it in.
>
> Cheers
>
> Bill
>
> Is your data 5 Star?
>
> (Added 2010). This year, in order to encourage people - especially government data owners - along the road to good linked data, I have developed this star rating system.
>
> ★ 	Available on the web (whatever format), but with an open licence
> ★★ 	Available as machine-readable structured data (e.g. Excel instead of image scan of a table)
> ★★★ 	As (2) plus non-proprietary format (e.g. CSV instead of Excel)
> ★★★★ 	All the above, plus: use open standards from W3C (RDF and SPARQL) to identify things, so that people can point at your stuff
> ★★★★★ 	All the above, plus: link your data to other people’s data to provide context
>
> How well does your data do? You can buy 5 star data mugs, T-shirts and bumper stickers from the W3C shop at Cafepress: use them to get your colleagues and fellow conference-goers thinking 5 star linked data. (Profits also help W3C :-).
>
> Now in 2010, people have been pressing me, for government data, to add a new requirement, and that is there should be metadata about the data itself, and that that metadata should be available from a major catalog. Any open dataset (or even datasets which are not but should be open) can be registered at ckan.net. Government datasets from the UK and US should be registered at data.gov.uk or data.gov respectively. Other countries I expect to develop their own registries. Yes, there should be metadata about your dataset. That may be the subject of a new note in this series.

-- 
Christopher Gutteridge -- http://id.ecs.soton.ac.uk/person/1248

/ Lead Developer, EPrints Project, http://eprints.org/
/ Web Projects Manager, ECS, University of Southampton, http://www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/
/ Webmaster, Web Science Trust, http://www.webscience.org/
Received on Wednesday, 9 March 2011 21:09:48 UTC

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.3.1 : Sunday, 31 March 2013 14:24:31 UTC