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Linked Data Book: HTML Version Live at linkeddatabook.com (was: Re: ANN: New book about Linked Data published)

From: Tom Heath <tom.heath@talis.com>
Date: Wed, 2 Mar 2011 13:32:12 +0000
Message-ID: <AANLkTimwSD-1NG0T+Efa+og_+OKKoMDQNQr+F2bWuwdW@mail.gmail.com>
To: public-lod <public-lod@w3.org>, Semantic Web <semantic-web@w3.org>
Hi all,

As promised in Chris's original mail, the freely accessible HTML
version of the Linked Data book went online yesterday at:

http://linkeddatabook.com/

Today the text has been enhanced with some basic RDFa markup using
BIBO, FOAF and DC terms vocabularies:
<http://www.w3.org/2007/08/pyRdfa/extract?uri=http%3A%2F%2Flinkeddatabook.com%2Feditions%2F1.0%2F&format=pretty-xml&warnings=false&parser=lax&space-preserve=true>

Links to access/order electronic and hard copies of the book are also
listed on the http://linkeddatabook.com/ site.

We'd like to thank the publisher Morgan & Claypool for agreeing to
this version of the book being made freely accessible.

Hope you enjoy the book :)

Cheers,

Tom Heath and Christian Bizer.

-- 
Dr Tom Heath
Lead Researcher
Talis Systems Ltd
T: 0870 400 5000
W: http://www.talis.com/
W: http://tomheath.com/id/me

On 17 February 2011 15:05, Chris Bizer <chris@bizer.de> wrote:
> Hi all,
>
>
>
> Tom Heath and I have been working on a book about Linked Data over the last
> months. We are very happy to announce today that the PDF version of the book
> is available from Morgan & Claypool Publishers.
>
>
>
> The book gives an overview of the principles of Linked Data as well as the
> Web of Data that has emerged through the application of these principles. It
> discusses patterns for publishing Linked Data, describes deployed Linked
> Data applications and examines their architecture.
>
>
>
> The book is published by Morgan & Claypool in the series Synthesis Lectures
> on the Semantic Web: Theory and Technology edited by James Hendler and Frank
> van Harmelen. See:
>
>
>
> http://www.morganclaypool.com/doi/abs/10.2200/S00334ED1V01Y201102WBE001
>
>
>
> The PDF version of the book is currently accessible to members of
> organizations that have licensed the Morgan & Claypool Synthesis Lectures
> collection.  In addition, the PDF version of the book can be purchased for
> 30 US$ via the Morgan & Claypool website.
>
>
>
> Within the next two weeks, the print version of the book will be available
> at Amazon. A bit later, the print version will be available via other
> channels and can also be ordered directly from Morgan & Claypool.
>
>
>
> On March 1st, 2011, we will publish a free HTML version of the book at
> http://linkeddatabook.com/
>
> We are currently still busy with producing the HTML version, so please
> excuse the delay.
>
>
>
> Please find the abstract and table of contents of the book below:
>
>
>
> Abstract of the Book
>
>
>
> The World Wide Web has enabled the creation of a global information space
> comprising linked documents. As the Web becomes ever more enmeshed with our
> daily lives, there is a growing desire for direct access to raw data not
> currently available on the Web or bound up in hypertext documents. Linked
> Data provides a publishing paradigm in which not only documents, but also
> data, can be a first class citizen of the Web, thereby enabling the
> extension of the Web with a global data space based on open standards - the
> Web of Data. In this Synthesis lecture we provide readers with a detailed
> technical introduction to Linked Data. We begin by outlining the basic
> principles of Linked Data, including coverage of relevant aspects of Web
> architecture. The remainder of the text is based around two main themes -
> the publication and consumption of Linked Data. Drawing on a practical
> Linked Data scenario, we provide guidance and best practices on:
> architectural approaches to publishing Linked Data; choosing URIs and
> vocabularies to identify and describe resources; deciding what data to
> return in a description of a resource on the Web; methods and frameworks for
> automated linking of data sets; and testing and debugging approaches for
> Linked Data deployments. We give an overview of existing Linked Data
> applications and then examine the architectures that are used to consume
> Linked Data from the Web, alongside existing tools and frameworks that
> enable these. Readers can expect to gain a rich technical understanding of
> Linked Data fundamentals, as the basis for application development, research
> or further study.
>
>
>
> Table of Contents
>
>
>
> 1. Introduction
>
>
>
> 1.1 The Data Deluge
>
> 1.2 The Rationale for Linked Data
>
> 1.2.1 Structure Enables Sophisticated Processing
>
> 1.2.2 Hyperlinks Connect Distributed Data
>
> 1.3 From Data Islands to a Global Data Space
>
>
>
> 2 Principles of Linked Data
>
>
>
> 2.1 The Principles in a Nutshell
>
> 2.2 Naming Things with URIs
>
> 2.3 Making URIs Defererenceable
>
> 2.3.1 303 URIs
>
> 2.3.2 Hash URIs
>
> 2.3.3 Hash versus 303
>
> 2.4 Providing Useful RDF Information
>
> 2.4.1 The RDF Data Model
>
> 2.4.2 RDF Serialization Formats
>
> 2.5 Including Links to other Things
>
> 2.5.1 Relationship Links
>
> 2.5.2 Identity Links
>
> 2.5.3 Vocabulary Links
>
> 2.6 Conclusions
>
>
>
> 3 TheWeb of Data
>
>
>
> 3.1 Bootstrapping theWeb of Data
>
> 3.2 Topology of theWeb of Data
>
> 3.2.1 Cross-Domain Data
>
> 3.2.2 Geographic Data
>
> 3.2.3 Media Data
>
> 3.2.4 Government Data
>
> 3.2.5 Libraries and Education
>
> 3.2.6 Life Sciences Data
>
> 3.2.7 Retail and Commerce
>
> 3.2.8 User Generated Content and Social Media
>
> 3.3 Conclusions
>
>
>
> 4 Linked Data Design Considerations
>
>
>
> 4.1 Using URIs as Names for Things
>
> 4.1.1 Minting HTTP URIs
>
> 4.1.2 Guidelines for Creating Cool URIs
>
> 4.1.3 Example URIs
>
> 4.2 Describing Things with RDF
>
> 4.2.1 Literal Triples and Outgoing Links
>
> 4.2.2 Incoming Links
>
> 4.2.3 Triples that Describe Related Resources
>
> 4.2.4 Triples that Describe the Description
>
> 4.3 Publishing Data about Data
>
> 4.3.1 Describing a Data Set
>
> 4.3.2 Provenance Metadata
>
> 4.3.3 Licenses,Waivers and Norms for Data
>
> 4.4 Choosing and Using Vocabularies to Describe Data
>
> 4.4.1 SKOS, RDFS and OWL
>
> 4.4.2 RDFS Basics
>
> 4.4.3 A Little OWL
>
> 4.4.4 Reusing Existing Terms
>
> 4.4.5 Selecting Vocabularies
>
> 4.4.6 Defining Terms
>
> 4.5 Making Links with RDF
>
> 4.5.1 Making Links within a Data Set
>
> 4.5.2 Making Links with External Data Sources
>
> 4.5.3 Setting RDF Links Manually
>
> 4.5.4 Auto-generating RDF Links
>
>
>
> 5 Recipes for Publishing Linked Data
>
>
>
> 5.1 Linked Data Publishing Patterns
>
> 5.1.1 Patterns in a Nutshell
>
> 5.1.2 Additional Considerations
>
> 5.2 The Recipes
>
> 5.2.1 Serving Linked Data as Static RDF/XML Files
>
> 5.2.2 Serving Linked Data as RDF Embedded in HTML Files
>
> 5.2.3 Serving RDF and HTML with Custom Server-Side Scripts
>
> 5.2.4 Serving Linked Data from Relational Databases
>
> 5.2.5 Serving Linked Data from RDF Triple Stores
>
> 5.2.6 Serving RDF byWrapping Existing Application orWeb APIs
>
> 5.3 Additional Approaches to Publishing Linked Data
>
> 5.4 Testing and Debugging Linked Data
>
> 5.5 Linked Data Publishing Checklist
>
>
>
> 6 Consuming Linked Data
>
>
>
> 6.1 Deployed Linked Data Applications
>
> 6.1.1 Generic Applications
>
> 6.1.2 Domain-specific Applications
>
> 6.2 Developing a Linked Data Mashup
>
> 6.2.1 Software Requirements
>
> 6.2.2 Accessing Linked Data URIs
>
> 6.2.3 Representing Data Locally using Named Graphs
>
> 6.2.4 Querying Local Data with SPARQL
>
> 6.3 Architecture of Linked Data Applications
>
> 6.3.1 Accessing theWeb of Data
>
> 6.3.2 Vocabulary Mapping
>
> 6.3.3 Identity Resolution
>
> 6.3.4 Provenance Tracking
>
> 6.3.5 Data Quality Assessment
>
> 6.3.6 CachingWeb Data Locally
>
> 6.3.7 UsingWeb Data in the Application Context
>
> 6.4 Effort Distribution between Publishers, Consumers and Third Parties
>
>
>
> 7 Summary andOutlook
>
>
>
> Bibliography
>
> Authors' Biographies
>
>
>
> We would like to thank the series editors Jim Hendler and Frank van Harmelen
> for giving us the opportunity and the impetus to write this book.
> Summarizing the state of the art in Linked Data was a job that needed doing
> -- we are glad they asked us. It has been a long process, throughout which
> Mike Morgan of Morgan & Claypool has shown the patience of a saint, for
> which we are extremely grateful. Richard Cyganiak wrote a significant
> portion of the 2007 tutorial How to Publish Linked Data on the Web, which
> inspired a number of sections of this book -- thank you Richard. Mike
> Bergman, Dan Brickley, Fabio Ciravegna, Ian Dickinson, John Goodwin, Harry
> Halpin, Frank van Harmelen, Olaf Hartig, Andreas Harth, Michael Hausenblas,
> Jim Hendler, Bernadette Hyland, Toby Inkster, Anja Jentzsch, Libby Miller,
> Yves Raimond, Matthew Rowe, Daniel Schwabe, Denny Vrandecic, and David Wood
> reviewed drafts of the book and provided valuable feedback when we needed
> fresh pairs of eyes -- they deserve our gratitude. We also thank the
> European Commission for supporting the creation of this book by funding the
> LATC -- LOD Around The Clock project (Ref. No. 256975). Lastly, we would
> like to thank the developers of LaTeX and Subversion, without which this
> exercise in remote, collaborative authoring would not have been possible.
>
>
>
> Have fun reading the book J
>
>
>
> Tom Heath and Christian Bizer
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Prof. Dr. Christian Bizer
>
> Web-based Systems Group
>
> Freie Universität Berlin
>
> +49 30 838 55509
>
> http://www.bizer.de
>
> chris@bizer.de
>
>
>
> ________________________________
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Received on Wednesday, 2 March 2011 13:32:45 UTC

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