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Re: Language Support for Triples and Linked Data

From: Nathan <nathan@webr3.org>
Date: Thu, 28 Jan 2010 23:00:09 +0000
Message-ID: <4B6216F9.5080400@webr3.org>
To: Joshua Shinavier <josh@fortytwo.net>
CC: Linked Data community <public-lod@w3.org>
Joshua Shinavier wrote:
> On Thu, Jan 28, 2010 at 8:57 AM, Nathan <nathan@webr3.org> wrote:
>> Hi All,
> 
> 
> Hi Nathan,
> 
> 
>> Does anybody know of any programming languages, released or in
>> development / patching which support for EAV / triples / URIs as
>> attribute/variable names
> 
> Marko mentioned Ripple (in addition to the new Gremlin language),
> which is a scripting language designed for traversal-based operations
> on Linked Data (and other RDF data sets). In Ripple, programs are
> identified by URIs and expressed with RDF triples (as RDF lists).
> With the right setup, programs can actually be embedded in the Web as
> Linked Data.
> 
> 
> 
>> or native support of xsd types?
> 
> 
> All of Ripple's basic data types are drawn from XML Schema.  Ripple
> follows Turtle in most of its syntax, including abbreviated syntax for
> xsd:boolean, xsd:integer, xsd:double, and xsd:decimal values. xsd:long
> and xsd:string are also supported natively.  For example, the
> following gets you the population of France as an xsd:long (because
> that's what the CIA Factbook linked data gives you):
> 
>     @prefix factbook: <http://www4.wiwiss.fu-berlin.de/factbook/ns#> .
>     @define france: <http://www4.wiwiss.fu-berlin.de/factbook/resource/France> .
> 
>     :france >> factbook:population_total >> .
> 
> There are language primitives like "greater than" which are able to
> consume the xsd:long value and do useful things with it, e.g.
> 
>     @define country neighborWithHigherPop:
>         country factbook:landboundary >>
>         (factbook:population_total >>
>             country factbook:population_total >> gt >>) require >> .
> 
>     :france >> :neighborWithHigherPop >> .
> 
> That last line gets you all of France's neighbors with a population
> greater than France's.
> 
> 

Joshua, Marko,

Thanks for the links, Ripple looks especially interesting & something
about it just makes sense, so definitely going to have a play with that one!

Something about the way it works with data that rings a distant bell in
my mind; I've seen this manner of processing somewhere in the past but
can't quite put my finger on it..

Many Regards / Much Appreciated,

Nathan
Received on Thursday, 28 January 2010 23:01:54 UTC

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