W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-lod@w3.org > September 2009

Re: Making human-friendly linked data pages more human-friendly

From: Kingsley Idehen <kidehen@openlinksw.com>
Date: Tue, 15 Sep 2009 10:33:37 -0400
Message-ID: <4AAFA5C1.9050307@openlinksw.com>
To: Adrian Walker <adriandwalker@gmail.com>
CC: public-lod@w3.org, "dbpedia-discussion@lists.sourceforge.net" <dbpedia-discussion@lists.sourceforge.net>
Adrian Walker wrote:
> Hi Kingsley & All --
>
> Good to see that the top layers of the cake are getting some 
> attention.  After all that's where the icing is (:-)
>
> We have an approach to making the results from RDF and other queries 
> more friendly.  It's online at the site below [1,2].
>
> However, the more you think about this, the more you realize that user 
> friendly answer displays are  necessary, but not sufficient for the 
> general population of users.
>
>  A big advantage of RDF is that it should enable ordinary users to ask 
> things no-one has thought of asking before.  Using their own words and 
> phrases.  Handing them a SPARQL manual definitely falls short.
>
> We approach this by supporting the writing of rules in English into a 
> browser.  Then users can run the rules, again in the browser.  When 
> necessary, SQL is generated automatically from the rules.
>
> That's still not the whole story though.  Reasoning over RDF gets 
> complicated, arguably much more so than over SQL databases.  This 
> raises a question of trust.  How do I know what the system did when it 
> suggested that I invest everything in Lehman Brothers?
>
> The system [1] produces English explanations, based on underlying 
> proof trees, showing the what inferences and data were used in 
> answering a question.  You can see a simple of example of this by 
> running [2] in a browser, and asking for explanations.
>
> Apologies to folks who have seen this before, and thanks for comments.
>
>                                              -- Adrian
>
> [1]  Internet Business Logic
> A Wiki and SOA Endpoint for Executable /Open /Vocabulary English over 
> SQL and RDF
> Online at www.reengineeringllc.com 
> <http://www.reengineeringllc.com>    Shared use is /free/
>
> [2]  
> www.reengineeringllc.com/demo_agents/RDFQueryLangComparison1.agent 
> <http://www.reengineeringllc.com/demo_agents/RDFQueryLangComparison1.agent>

Adrian,

Cool!

Also note the LOD Cloud Cache instance at: http://lod.openlinksw.com, 
also note it does also Web Services exposed at the endpoint: 
http://lod.openlinksw.com/fct. Naturally, the same applies to DBpedia 
via: http://dbpedia.org/fct.

The more services, views etc.. around DBpedia and the rest of the Linked 
Data Cloud,  the better  :-)

Context Fluidity, Data Heterogeneity, and Powerful Lookup capabilities 
are age-old problem areas that the Linked Data meme addresses very well.

Kingsley

>
>
>
> On Tue, Sep 15, 2009 at 7:34 AM, Kingsley Idehen 
> <kidehen@openlinksw.com <mailto:kidehen@openlinksw.com>> wrote:
>
>     Matthias Samwald wrote:
>
>         A central idea of linked data is, in my understanding, that
>         every resource has not only a HTTP - resolvable RDF
>         description of itself, but also a human-friendly rendering
>         that can be viewed in a web browser. With the increasing
>         popularity of RDFa, the URIs of these resources are not only
>         hidden away in triplestores, but become increasingly exposed
>         on web pages. People want to click on them, and, hopefully,
>         not all of these people come from the core community of RDF
>         enthusiasts.
>
>         This means that the HTML rendering of linked data resources
>         might need to look a bit sexier than it does today. I dare to
>         say that the Pubby-esque rendering of DBpedia pages such as
>         http://dbpedia.org/page/Primary_motor_cortex
>         is helpful to get a quick overview of the RDF triples about
>         this resource, but non-RDF-enthusiasts would not find it very
>         inviting.
>
>     Pubby isn't how DBpedia is published today. It is done via
>     Virtuoso (been so for quite a long time now), which has in-built
>     Linked Data Publishing/Deployment functionality [1].
>
>
>         This could be improved by changes in the layout, and possibly
>         a manually curated ordering of properties. For example,
>         http://d.opencalais.com/er/company/ralg-tr1r/f8a13a13-8dbc-3d7e-82b6-1d7968476cae.html
>
>         definitely looks more inviting than the typical DBpedia page
>         (albeit still a bit sterile).
>
>     You can tweak the HTML template and just send it to us. BTW, the
>     URIBurner [2] pages which also use exactly the same Linked Data
>     Deployment functionality behind DBpedia also have a slightly
>     different look and feel. That can be applied to DBpedia in nano
>     seconds.
>
>
>         In the case of DBpedia, it might be better to expose the
>         excellent human-readable Wikipedia page for each resource,
>         plus a prominently positioned 'show raw data' tab at the top.
>         For other linked data resources that are not derived from
>         existing human-friendly web pages, a few stylistic changes
>         (ala OpenCalais) already might improve the situation a lot.
>
>         Note that this comment is not intended to be a criticism of
>         DBpedia, but of all Linked Data resources that expose HTML
>         descriptions of resources. DBpedia is just the most popular
>         example.
>
>     Not seen as criticism, just a wake up call. On our part (OpenLink)
>     we've always sought to draw a small line between OpenLink branding
>     and the more community oriented DBpedia project. Thus, our
>     preference has been to wait for community preferences, and then
>     within that context apply updates to the project, especially re.
>     aesthetics.
>
>     Links:
>
>     1.
>     http://virtuoso.openlinksw.com/Whitepapers/html/vdld_html/VirtDeployingLinkedDataGuide.html
>     -- Virtuoso Linked Data Deployment Guide
>     2. http://www.uriburner.com/wiki/URIBurner/
>
>     Kingsley
>
>
>         Cheers,
>         Matthias Samwald
>
>         DERI Galway, Ireland
>         http://deri.ie/
>
>         Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution & Cognition Research,
>         Austria
>         http://kli.ac.at/
>
>
>
>         --------------------------------------------------
>         From: "Danny Ayers" <danny.ayers@gmail.com
>         <mailto:danny.ayers@gmail.com>>
>         Sent: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 4:03 AM
>         To: <public-lod@w3.org <mailto:public-lod@w3.org>>
>         Subject: dbpedia not very visible, nor fun
>
>             It seems I have a Wikipedia page in my name (ok, I only
>             did fact-check
>             edits, ok!?). So tonight I went looking for the
>             corresponding triples,
>             looking for my ultimate URI...
>
>             Google "dbpedia" => front page, with news
>
>             on the list on the left is "Online Access"
>
>             what do you get?
>
>             [[
>             The DBpedia data set can be accessed online via a SPARQL query
>             endpoint and as Linked Data.
>
>             Contents
>             1. Querying DBpedia
>             1.1. Public SPARQL Endpoint
>             1.2. Public Faceted Web Service Interface
>             1.3. Example queries displayed with the Berlin SNORQL
>             query explorer
>             1.4. Examples rendering DBpedia Data with Google Map
>             1.5. Example displaying DBpedia Data with Exhibit
>             1.6. Example displaying DBpedia Data with gFacet
>             2. Linked Data
>             2.1. Background
>             2.2. The DBpedia Linked Data Interface
>             2.3. Sample Resources
>             2.4. Sample Views of 2 Sample DBpedia Resources
>             3. Semantic Web Crawling Sitemap
>             ]]
>
>             Yeah. Unless you're a triplehead none of these will mean a
>             thing. Even
>             then it's not obvious.
>
>             Could someone please stick something more rewarding near
>             the top! I
>             don't know, maybe a Google-esque text entry form field for
>             a regex on
>             the SPARQL. Anything but blurb.
>
>             Even being relatively familiar with the tech, I still
>             haven't a clue
>             how to take my little query (do I have a URI here?) forward.
>
>             Presentation please.
>
>             Cheers,
>             Danny.
>
>             -- 
>             http://danny.ayers.name
>
>
>
>
>
>
>     -- 
>
>
>     Regards,
>
>     Kingsley Idehen       Weblog:
>     http://www.openlinksw.com/blog/~kidehen
>     <http://www.openlinksw.com/blog/%7Ekidehen>
>     President & CEO OpenLink Software     Web: http://www.openlinksw.com
>
>
>
>
>
>


-- 


Regards,

Kingsley Idehen	      Weblog: http://www.openlinksw.com/blog/~kidehen
President & CEO 
OpenLink Software     Web: http://www.openlinksw.com
Received on Tuesday, 15 September 2009 14:34:25 UTC

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