W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-ldp@w3.org > March 2013

Re: Section 4: LDPR/non-LDPR formal definitions

From: Henry Story <henry.story@bblfish.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 15:56:15 +0100
Cc: public-ldp@w3.org
Message-Id: <AE72575A-F63C-4A0D-A9FF-E7A6C17274E2@bblfish.net>
To: Kingsley Idehen <kidehen@openlinksw.com>

On 26 Mar 2013, at 15:43, Kingsley Idehen <kidehen@openlinksw.com> wrote:

> On 3/26/13 10:39 AM, Kingsley Idehen wrote:
>>> 
>>> You can publish html with all the links broken, and that will still be correct html. Pages that publish information pointing to broken links are just a lot less interesting and useful to use, and people tend not to link to such pages. Just as a road is still a road even if in a dangerous neighborhood.
>> 
>> Yes, but the browser will still render the HTML page with broken links if it's served as text/html. It might not do so if it's served as text/plain. 

Indeed. If it is served as text/plain it is should show you just the ascii with no interpretation of the
tags as html tags. 

> To be clearer:
> 
> text/html will be rendered to a page comprised of broken links.
> 
> text/plain might not even be rendered in a manner to produces a page with any functional links modulo invocation content sniffing heuristic on the part of the browser.

This is easy to test. I put up a text/plain page here:
   http://bblfish.net/tmp/2013/03/26/htmlServedAsText.html

$ curl -i http://bblfish.net/tmp/2013/03/26/htmlServedAsText.html
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 14:55:06 GMT
Server: Apache/2.2.16 (Unix) mod_ssl/2.2.16 OpenSSL/0.9.8o DAV/2 PHP/5.2.12 mod_fcgid/2.3.4
Last-Modified: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 14:52:38 GMT
ETag: "46b6a-bf-4d8d51297ce9f"
Accept-Ranges: bytes
Content-Length: 191
Content-Type: text/plain

<html>
<head><title>HTML served with mime type text/plain</head>
<body>
  This is an example html document served with mime type text/plain.
What does your browser show you?
</body>
</html>


On Safari, Chrome and Netscape it shows it as plain text. That is it does no interpretation 
whatsoever more than converting them to ascii strings and displaying them as such. This
is indeed the correct behavior. You get as a user to see the "<html>..." characters as posted.

So as you see when you post HTML it can show you links even if they are broken. Changing the
mime type just changes the interpretation of the bytes.

> 
> -- 
> 
> Regards,
> 
> Kingsley Idehen	
> Founder & CEO
> OpenLink Software
> Company Web: http://www.openlinksw.com
> Personal Weblog: http://www.openlinksw.com/blog/~kidehen
> Twitter/Identi.ca handle: @kidehen
> Google+ Profile: https://plus.google.com/112399767740508618350/about
> LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/kidehen
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 

Social Web Architect
http://bblfish.net/



Received on Tuesday, 26 March 2013 14:56:46 UTC

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