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[ESW Wiki] Update of "its0908LinguisticMarkup" by GoutamSaha

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Date: Wed, 12 Oct 2005 02:12:14 -0000
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Dear Wiki user,

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The following page has been changed by GoutamSaha:
http://esw.w3.org/topic/its0908LinguisticMarkup


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  =='''Understanding Sentence-Level Markups:-'''==
  
+ A ''sentence'' is a set or group of words which makes complete sense. 
- A ''sentence'' is a set or group of words which makes complete sense.  Sentences are of four kinds: (a) a ''Declarative or Assertive'' sentence (that makes a statement or assertion, e.g., ''He sat on a chair.''), (b) an ''Interrogative'' sentence (that asks a question, e.g., Where do you go ?) (c)an ''Imperative'' sentence (that expresses a command or an entreaty, e.g., Be quiet.), (d)an ''Exclamatory'' sentence (that expresses strong feeling, e.g., How cold the day is !).
+ ''Semantically'', '''Sentences''' are of major four kinds: (a) a ''Declarative or Assertive'' sentence (that makes a statement or assertion, e.g., ''He sat on a chair.''), (b) an ''Interrogative'' sentence (that asks a question, e.g., Where do you go ?) (c)an ''Imperative'' sentence (that expresses a command or an entreaty, e.g., Be quiet.), (d)an ''Exclamatory'' sentence (that expresses strong feeling, e.g., How cold the day is !).
+ Other semantic classifications of sentences are: (e) '''Praying Sentence''' expresses a prayer, e.g., "May God bless you." (f) '''Causative Sentence''' expresses a cause and effect or condition, e.g., "If you work hard you will definitely succeed." (g) '''Suspicion Sentence''' expresses a guessing or suspicion, e.g., "It might rain now." (h)'''Cursed Sentence''' expresses an imprecation, "You devil, get ruined." (i) '''Proverbial Sentence''' denotes a proverbial expression, e.g., "Cut your coat according to your cloth." "Grapes are sour."
+ 
  A sentence is diveded into two main parts- (a) the ''Subject'' (i.e., the person or thing about which something is said) and (b) the ''Predicate'' (i.e., what is said about the person or thing denoted by the subject.) The subject may consist of one word or several words. The predicate may also consist one or several words.  In other words, we must have a ''subject'' to speak about and we must ''say or predicate'' something about that subject. For an example, in the sentence "The sun gives light.", "The sun" is the ''subject'' and "gives light." is the ''predicate''.  
  
  '''A Phrase''' is a group of words which makes sense, but not complete sense. For an example, "in the east" in the sentence "The sun rises in the east." is a ''phrase''. '''A Clause''' is a group of words which forms part of a ''sentence,'' and contains a ''Subject'' and a ''Predicate.'' For eample, in the sentence "She has a chain which is made of gold", the group of words "which is made of gold" is called a clause that contains a Subject (which) and a Predicate (is made of gold). There are three major ''formative categories of sentences'':
Received on Wednesday, 12 October 2005 11:56:32 UTC

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