W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-i18n-its@w3.org > July to September 2005

[ESW Wiki] Update of "its0503ReqSpan" by TimFoster

From: <w3t-archive+esw-wiki@w3.org>
Date: Wed, 13 Jul 2005 07:50:32 -0000
To: w3t-archive+esw-wiki@w3.org
Message-ID: <20050713075032.11365.26529@localhost.localdomain>
Dear Wiki user,

You have subscribed to a wiki page or wiki category on "ESW Wiki" for change notification.

The following page has been changed by TimFoster:
http://esw.w3.org/topic/its0503ReqSpan


The comment on the change is:
Using correct template/format and incorporated Felix's fix re. its ns in example

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  
  = Span-like Element =
  
- == Description: ==
+ == Summary ==
  
- A span-like element is required to allow authors to mark sections text that may have special properties, from a localisation and internationalisation point of view. Span-like elements are required as a general concept for the different requirements for the ITS.
+ A span-like element is required to allow authors to mark sections text that may have special properties, from a localisation and internationalisation point of view.
  
  
- == Background: ==
+ == Challenge/Issue ==
  
- This allows localisation tools to determine their behaviour on certain sections of text. This could be for sections of text that need to be translated by a domain-expert (as with source code fragments) or need special terminology in order to be properly translated. In particular, a span-like element can be useful to help translation tools determine where to apply sentence-breaks and also to assist word-counting algorithms.  A span-like element is also extremely useful for marking langauge information in source files which translation tools can also use to determine which translation process to use for each given section of text (eg. a Latin quotation in a section of English text is often intended to be left in Latin for the translated version of the English text.) Other uses are foreseen, within the scope of the ITS.
+ Given a section of XML text, there's often insufficient information in the original markup in order to determine how exactly the contents should be dealt with from a localisation and internationalisation point of view. Adding various span-like elements to the markup at the authoring stage, would allow this information to be passed on to localisation processes (either human or machine assisted processes).
+ 
+ For example, span-like elements could be used to mark sections of text that need to be translated by a domain-expert (as with source code fragments) or mark those that need special terminology in order to be properly translated. In particular, a span-like element can be useful to help translation tools determine where to apply sentence-breaks and also to assist metrics-calculating algorithms.
+ 
+ A span-like element is also extremely useful for marking langauge information in source files which translation tools can also be used to determine which translation process to use for each given section of text (eg. a Latin quotation in a section of English text is often intended to be left in Latin for the translated version of the English text.) Other uses are foreseen, within the scope of the ITS.
  
  One example would be the following sentence, which contains some source code that we would like to treat specially during translation :
  
@@ -28, +32 @@

  The statement in the Java programming language, System.out.println("Hello World!"); prints the text "Hello World!" to standard output.
  }}}
  
- Here, we would like to put a spanning element around the source code fragment to indicate that it is not standard text for translation and should be translated by a someone familiar with the Java programming language. Also, translation tools should treat the exclamation points in the sample text carefully with respect to sentence-segmentation if they perform that function.
+ Here, we would like to put a span-like element around the source code fragment to indicate that it is not standard text for translation and should be translated by a someone familiar with the Java programming language. Also, translation tools should treat the exclamation points in the sample text carefully with respect to sentence-segmentation if they perform that function.
  
  While the <code> tag in XHTML could be used to markup this text (in an XHTML document), it's often not specific enough for translators : it doesn't tell the translator what sort of source code is contained inside the tag, nor does it mark which portions of the code contents are translatable.
  
  A suggestion of the sort of usage we could forsee for a span-like element could be the following :
  
  {{{
- The statement in the Java programming language <code><span:span-donttranslate>System.out.println("<its:/span-donttranslate>Hello World<its:span-donttranslate>");<its:/span-donttranslate></code> prints the text "Hello World!" to standard output.'
+ The statement in the Java programming language <code><its:span-donttranslate>System.out.println("<its:/span-donttranslate>Hello World<its:span-donttranslate>");<its:/span-donttranslate></code> prints the text "Hello World!" to standard output.'
  }}}
  
- '''[[FS-''' Just a minor comment: <span:span-donttranslate> should be <its:span-donttranslate>, right?''']]'''
- 
- An alternative to this sort of construction, would be to put the translatable text in a separate document, and then referr to that using using some form of text, linking, for example :
+ An alternative to this sort of construction, would be to put the translatable text in a separate document, and then refer to that using using some form of linking mechanism, for example :
  
  {{{
  <code>System.out.println("&java.code.example.text;");</code>
  }}}
- 
- In these examples, the point has been to shift some of the responsiblity of identifying translatable vs. non-translatable content off the translation tools author, or at the very least, make recommendations to content authors to separate out the translatable vs. non-translatable portions of text more clearly.
  
  Another example is shown below, where we have a piece of text that contains a filename which should also not be translated :
  
@@ -55, +55 @@

  accounts.
  }}}
  
- In this case, the filename "/etc/passwd" should not be translated, and we would like to add markup that indicates this.
+ In this case, the filename "/etc/passwd" should not be translated, and we would like to add markup to indicate this.
+ 
+ 
+ In these examples, we show that we're aiming to shift some of the responsiblity of identifying translatable vs. non-translatable content off the translation tools author, on to the content author, or at the very least, make recommendations to content authors to separate out the translatable vs. non-translatable portions of text more clearly.
+ 
+ == Note ==
  
  This requirement is related to some other requirements, namely :
  
Received on Wednesday, 13 July 2005 10:17:33 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Tuesday, 8 January 2008 14:12:45 GMT