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Re: ITS Use Case - Terminology Harvesting and Translation

From: Lieske, Christian <christian.lieske@sap.com>
Date: Thu, 24 Mar 2005 16:35:25 +0100
Message-ID: <0F568FE519230641B5F84502E0979DD10280EA95@dewdfe12.wdf.sap.corp>
To: <public-i18n-its@w3.org>

>Subject: ITS Use Case - Terminology Harvesting and Translation

To me the term 'Terminology Harvesting' does not seem to have a clear
semantic yet. Thus, I would suggest to go for something like
'terminology marking' instead. The terminology-related ISO norms (e.g.
ISO 1087) seem to suggest 'terminography'. In
http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-i18n-its/2005JanMar/0004.html
, we seem to have used 'term identificiation'.

>Here is another one: 

>============================== 
>Description: 

>During the early stages of a project, it is a common practice to scan
the >source material to create a list of common terms that should be
translated >in advance, to provided a consistent terminology across
different >documents.

            I guess one could be more general here since terminology
work not only is motivated by translation, but also by source language
quality.

>Automated tools are often used for this purpose. The insertion of
special >markers to delimit terms within the source material helps the
user to >identify the proposed entries and view them within their
context.

            How about dropping 'Automated tools are often used for this
purpose'? or moving it somewhere else? My understanding is the
following: Terms should be marked. Marking can either be done purely
manually, or be computer-assisted.

>The same markup can be used further down the project, during
translation, >to help the translators match up the source terms with
their agreed upon >translations.

>Stakeholders: 

>This scenario relates to the authors or the terminologists that create
the >glossaries, as well as the translators that translate the source
material.

To me, term markers can also be of interest to people working on quality
management/assurance. For example, the absence of a term marker in a 5
page document may be an indicator for an issue, or discrepancies between
content of a term bank and term markers may trigger a special step in
the workflow.

Best regards,
Christian
Received on Thursday, 24 March 2005 15:39:42 GMT

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