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[ESW Wiki] Update of "geoFAQxmllang" by 12.173.168.199

From: <w3t-archive+esw-wiki@w3.org>
Date: Tue, 05 Jul 2005 15:03:47 -0000
To: w3t-archive+esw-wiki@w3.org
Message-ID: <20050705150347.1602.66998@localhost.localdomain>
Dear Wiki user,

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The following page has been changed by 12.173.168.199:
http://esw.w3.org/topic/geoFAQxmllang


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  = xml:lang in XML document schemas =
  
+ When should I use xml:lang in an XML document schema (DTD) and when should I define my own element or attribute for passing language values?
- When should I use xml:lang in an XML document schema (DTD)?
- 
- '''[[RI''' i can't help thinking that either in the question or in a short background section you should add "nd when to use your own element (or attribute) for passing language values".  I'm not convinced that the question wording really makes it clear what the issue is ''']]'''
  
  == Answer ==
  
@@ -73, +71 @@

    </a>
  }}}
  
- In the example, the contents of elements <b> and <d> and the attribute ''attr'' of element <e> are all tagged as being in English ('en'). The content of element <c> is tagged with the empty language [[DRC 1July05 Maybe "'''the empty language'''" needs explanation]]. The content of element <f> is tagged as being in German ('de'). Element <e> itself contains what appears to be a language tag ("en-US"): its content is not in English, but rather conveys the value of "U.S. English".
+ In the example, the contents of elements <b> and <d> and the attribute ''attr'' of element <e> are all tagged as being in English ('en'). The content of element <c> is tagged with the "empty language" (that is, the language is specifically not identified or the text is not in a natural language: this is an example of unsetting the value of ''xml:lang''). The content of element <f> is tagged as being in German ('de'). Element <e> itself contains what appears to be a language tag ("en-US"): in that case its content is not in English, but rather conveys the value of "U.S. English".
  
Received on Tuesday, 5 July 2005 17:02:23 GMT

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