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Re: New version of Choosing language tags

From: Mark Davis ☕ <mark@macchiato.com>
Date: Thu, 8 Oct 2009 12:57:33 -0700
Message-ID: <30b660a20910081257x1d833bddgd3b70a6e6d7a5d8e@mail.gmail.com>
To: Richard Ishida <ishida@w3.org>
Cc: public-i18n-core@w3.org
Looks good. Some suggested edits. I'll use => for suggested changes:


Note: while we are giving people general advice, we need to add something
like the following early on.

A predominant factor determining the choice of language tag is the system
you are interacting with. For example, if you are using Java, you must use
"iw" (deprecated in BCP74) in place of "he" (recommended in BCP47).
Similarly, if you are working with a system that uses a particular casing
convention for file names with language tags (such as lowercase in
my-resources.fr-ca), then you need to follow that pattern.



On the other hand, if you are using language tags in a context where
letter-case is important, such as file names on some systems, you should
ensure that you, at least, are consistent in whatever choice you make, and
perhaps based your conventions on those of BCP47 to help maintain
consistency.
=>
On the other hand, if you may be using language tags in a context where
letter-case is important, such as file names on some systems. In such cases,
you should ensure that follow a consistent policy for casing; the BCP47
conventions are recommended for any new system.


There is no indication in the registry as to which you should use, but you
should try to ensure that within a single application or context you are
consistent.
=>
There is no indication in the registry as to which you should use, but you
should try to ensure that you consistently use the same code, typically
whatever is established for the system you are dealing with.


Where possible, you should use a single language subtag, rather than the
language+extlang pair, but language+extlang pairings are typically useful
for matching against existing language tag use within a given application.
So if you have been using zh-yue in your application, you can continue to
use it.
=>
Where possible, you should use a single language subtag, rather than the
language+extlang pair. The only significant exception is where "zh-yue" is
established practice for the system you are working with.


For example, if your application identified Mandarin Chinese in the past
using the language tag zh-CN (Chinese as used in Mainland China), you can
continue to use zh in this way.
=>
For example, the tag zh-CN (Chinese as used in Mainland China) de facto
represents "Mandarin as used in Mainland China"; using cmn-CN instead will
typically cause serious compatibility problems.


On the other hand, the CLDR database currently
=>
The CLDR database also

Mark


On Thu, Oct 8, 2009 at 11:52, Richard Ishida <ishida@w3.org> wrote:

> Chaps,
>
> I worked on integrating the comments from last night's discussion into the
> article.  I removed the previous change marks, so those that remain
> highlight key changes based on last night's discussion.
>
> http://www.w3.org/International/questions/qa-choosing-language-tags
>
> Mark, do you still think extra wording is necessary?  If not, I'll remove
> the remaining change marks and publish for wide review.  If so, could you
> send to me asap?  Note that I have made some changes already to the section
> in question
> http://www.w3.org/International/questions/qa-choosing-language-tags.php#extlangsubtag
>
> Cheers,
> RI
>
>
>
Received on Thursday, 8 October 2009 19:58:07 GMT

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