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Re: I18n comment: bidirectional ordering

From: Najib Tounsi <ntounsi@emi.ac.ma>
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 11:30:24 +0000
Message-ID: <43D76150.2070505@emi.ac.ma>
To: Martin Duerst <duerst@it.aoyama.ac.jp>
CC: ishida@w3.org, www-style@w3.org, public-i18n-core@w3.org
Martin Duerst wrote:

>
> At 19:53 06/01/21, ishida@w3.org wrote:
> >
> >Comment from the i18n review of:
> >http://www.w3.org/TR/2005/WD-css3-selectors-20051215/
> >
> >Comment 21
> >At http://www.w3.org/International/reviews/0601-css3-selectors/
> >Editorial/substantive: E
> >Location in reviewed document:
> >Sec. 7.2 
> [http://www.w3.org/TR/2005/WD-css3-selectors-20051215/#pseudo-elements]
> >, last para
> >
> >Comment:
> >It may be useful to provide an example to clarify the bidirectional
> >ordering point. We could probably do that for you, if needed.
>
> A very simple example, using lower case (!) for RTL:
>
> The logical sentence:
>     W3C is written in latin letters in hebrew.
> Is displayed as:
>     .werbeh ni srettel nital ni nettirw si W3C
> The first letter is "W", but it appears in the middle of the line
> due to reordering.
>
So the sytling apply to W. Example:



The same style apply to the three  paras.
Note the first letter of an arabic word at the beginning  of a latin 
para (2nd).

Here is the sourse (http://www.w3c.org.ma/Tests/InitLetter2.html) 
adapted from [1] p7.2, first example.
==============
<html><head>
<meta content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" http-equiv="content-type">
<title>Drop cap initial letter</title>
<style type="text/css">
P { font-size: 12pt; line-height: 1.2 }
P::first-letter { color: red; font-weight: bold;}
SPAN { text-transform: uppercase }
</style></head>
<body>

<p><span>The first</span> few words of an article
in The Economist.<br>
</p>

<p dir="rtl"><span>????</span> few words of an article
in The Economist.<br>
</p>

<p dir="rtl"><span>W3C</span> ???? ????? ? ?????? ?????
</p>

</body></html>
==============

> >Presumably, in ordinary right to left text, the user agent would be
> >expected to apply the styling to the character on the right of the line.
>
> Of course. I don't see any problem there; the text is very
> careful to always speak of 'first' rather than leftmost or
> whatever letter.
>
> >Note that this (presumably) applies really to Hebrew but not Arabic, 
> since
> >the latter script is cursive.
>
> I have a vague recollection of Arabic with letters of different size.
> I hope somebody can confirm.
> There is nothing in principle that would disallow making the first
> letter larger (or otherwise different in style) even if the script
> is cursive.

Cursive don't allow (badly?)  to have  a first letter larger than the 
rest of the word. Same example


Here is the source (http://www.w3c.org.ma/Tests/InitLetter.html)
P::first-letter { font-size:200%; font-weight: bold;}
in stead of
P::first-letter { color: red; font-weight: bold;}

Regards,

Najib

[1] http://www.w3.org/TR/2005/WD-css3-selectors-20051215/#first-letter

-- 
Najib TOUNSI (mailto:tounsi @ w3.org)
Bureau W3C au Maroc (http://www.w3c.org.ma/)
Ecole Mohammadia d'Ingenieurs, BP 765 Agdal-RABAT Maroc (Morocco)
Phone : +212 (0) 37 68 71 74  Fax : +212 (0) 37 77 88 53
Mobile: +212 (0) 61 22 00 30
Received on Wednesday, 25 January 2006 11:28:47 GMT

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