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[Bug 19925] New: Drop XHTML from the title of the document

From: <bugzilla@jessica.w3.org>
Date: Fri, 09 Nov 2012 20:07:39 +0000
To: public-html@w3.org
Message-ID: <bug-19925-2495@http.www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/>
https://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=19925

          Priority: P2
            Bug ID: 19925
                CC: eliotgra@microsoft.com, mike@w3.org,
                    public-html-wg-issue-tracking@w3.org,
                    public-html@w3.org
          Assignee: eliotgra@microsoft.com
           Summary: Drop XHTML from the title of the document
        QA Contact: public-html-bugzilla@w3.org
          Severity: enhancement
    Classification: Unclassified
                OS: Linux
          Reporter: rubys@intertwingly.net
          Hardware: PC
            Status: NEW
           Version: unspecified
         Component: HTML/XHTML Compatibility Authoring Guide (ed: Eliot
                    Graff)
           Product: HTML WG

Note: this is just a suggestion, feel free to dispose of it as you wish.  

As an alternative to dropping all normative requirements and publishing the
document as a Note, consider repositioning this document as a normative and
entirely optional profile of HTML which seeks to define constraints on the
serialization of a DOM tree in a robust manner that is likely to retain
semantics in when said serialization is reparsed using a variety of parsers, be
the full featured and  bug free HTML5 parsers, somewhat HTML aware parsers, and
even XML parsers.

Include in ths set requirements to using utf-8 even if not precisely required
by any of these parsers.

Add an intro section which describes the benefits of robust syntax, even when
producing expected to only be parsed and validated by fully HTML5 conforming
tools.  As an example, in HTML5, close tags for paragraph elements are
completely optional and will be inferred if not present.  Inclusion of close
tags cause no harm beyond a minor increase in transfer size (an increase often
mitigated by compression), but does allow validators to detect situations where
the implicit closing rules don't match what the author intended.

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Received on Friday, 9 November 2012 20:07:40 UTC

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