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RE: A New Feature for Blogging Platforms

From: Adam Sobieski <adamsobieski@hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Dec 2012 13:43:21 +0000
Message-ID: <SNT002-W93BE4BC8CAD14F215FAB24C5300@phx.gbl>
To: "public-html@w3.org" <public-html@w3.org>
CC: "development@drupal.org" <development@drupal.org>, "wp-forums@lists.automattic.com" <wp-forums@lists.automattic.com>
HTML Working Group,
Drupal Developer Team,
WordPress Developer Team,

Greetings.  For those interested in blogging-related digital publishing topics, and enhancements applicable to consumer advocacy, scholarly and scientific communication, and for other uses of blogs, I would like to provide an update.  The aforementioned new features, per-article pinging, have been posted to the WordPress website informationally and for discussion:

http://en.forums.wordpress.com/topic/new-blog-platform-feature


Also, if anybody knows of other developer teams to contact with regard to these new features, I would welcome others to spread the word about the new features for both bloggers and organizations.

An example usage scenario is that of a computer scientist writing an article for their blog and, while they ping a number of search engines for each article, they want to ping the ACM and IEEE for the specific blog article, which have, in the usage scenario, dynamic website content for computer scientists', ACM and IEEE computer scientists' compositions, including content hosted online as blog articles, or as forum messages.

Towards implementational topics, Web-related technologies, digital publishing technologies, the scientist blogger could have, in the example, logged on to their blogging platform and entered web services URL's for both the ACM and IEEE and, then, possibly via XML-RPC, the blog platform obtained metadata to display ACM and IEEE organizations in the various user interfaces of the blog platform for configurations per blog article, as well as other web services related data.  The blogger may also have logged on to the ACM and IEEE websites, if those websites required any concurrent configuration.  Thereafter, the scientist blogger could conveniently choose to, per blog article, ping either the ACM, the IEEE, or both, for specific blog articles to appear on webpages, along with their colleagues' content, adding value to the websites with fresh user-generated content, enhancing website-contextual interactions between users, enhancing online communities, and empowering bloggers.



Kind regards,

Adam Sobieski 		 	   		  
Received on Wednesday, 19 December 2012 13:43:49 UTC

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