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Re: Proposal for <canvas src> to allow images with structured fallback by Tab Atkins Jr.

From: Joshue O Connor <joshue.oconnor@cfit.ie>
Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2011 14:55:21 +0000
Message-ID: <4D78E659.6040404@cfit.ie>
To: Steve Faulkner <faulkner.steve@gmail.com>
CC: Leif Halvard Silli <xn--mlform-iua@xn--mlform-iua.no>, Laura Carlson <laura.lee.carlson@gmail.com>, HTML WG LIST <public-html@w3.org>, HTML Accessibility Task Force <public-html-a11y@w3.org>, "jackalmage@gmail.com" <jackalmage@gmail.com>
On 10/03/2011 13:47, Steve Faulkner wrote:
> Hi Leif,
> 
>> Viable solution to which problem?
> What I think is important is that a robust , programmatic method for
> providing structured text alternatives for non text content is provided in
> HTML5.
> Whether that is via longdesc or some other mechanism is immaterial. If
> longdesc is included in HTML5 but fails to be specced/implemented to be
> useful and robust then it will be a failure.

I agree.

> your wrote:
> "But, once again, which @role would the canvas@src in Tab's example get?
> 
> <canvas src="complex-chart.png">
>  <table>
>    -data that the chart represents-
>  </table>
> </canvas>"
> 
> [...] I think the role will depend entirely on the context it is used in.

Again, I agree with Steve.

In fact the role of the <canvas> element could be multifaceted. Take for
example, if <canvas> is used to construct a page with several kinds of
content, such as a chart, some tabular data, images etc. It would not
make sense to map <canvas> to only one specific role.

Do I know what role it should be mapped to? No, but it makes sense (to
me), that <canvas> is like a generic, well canvas, that semantic
elements can be applied to as needed, or at the very least accessed as
fallback if its not supported or whatever.

Cheers

Josh
Received on Thursday, 10 March 2011 14:58:06 UTC

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