W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-html@w3.org > June 2011

[Bug 13094] New: First there was the <img> tag. Now, with HTML5, <audio> and <video> tags are being introduced (which also have the helpful controls attribute). This covers the 3 most important media types, namely pictures, music, and videos. However, there is a fourth ty

From: <bugzilla@jessica.w3.org>
Date: Thu, 30 Jun 2011 03:08:35 +0000
To: public-html@w3.org
Message-ID: <bug-13094-2495@http.www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/>
http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=13094

           Summary: First there was the <img> tag. Now, with HTML5,
                    <audio> and <video> tags are being introduced (which
                    also have the helpful controls attribute). This covers
                    the 3 most important media types, namely pictures,
                    music, and videos. However, there is a fourth ty
           Product: HTML WG
           Version: unspecified
          Platform: Other
               URL: http://www.whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/#top
        OS/Version: other
            Status: NEW
          Severity: normal
          Priority: P3
         Component: HTML5 spec (editor: Ian Hickson)
        AssignedTo: ian@hixie.ch
        ReportedBy: contributor@whatwg.org
         QAContact: public-html-bugzilla@w3.org
                CC: mike@w3.org, public-html-wg-issue-tracking@w3.org,
                    public-html@w3.org


Specification: http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec/Overview.html
Multipage: http://www.whatwg.org/C#top
Complete: http://www.whatwg.org/c#top

Comment:
First there was the <img> tag. Now, with HTML5, <audio> and <video> tags are
being introduced (which also have the helpful controls attribute). This covers
the 3 most important media types, namely pictures, music, and videos. However,
there is a fourth type of digital media that is quickly becoming prevalent:
electronic publications such as ebooks and documents. As a matter of fact,
just like the other 3 media types have their own common codecs, the dominant
electronic publication codec/format is ePub. If there was such new element,
for instance it could be called <document>, it could be used to display ebooks
and other ePub documents (such as user manuals, academic papers, etc.) in a
webpage. And if there was an associated controls attribute, it could be used
to add next and previous button controls to switch between pages. Just as the
other media elements may help us eliminate the need to use proprietary
plug-ins such as Adobe Flash, a <document> element could help eliminate the
need for using other proprietary plug-ins, such as the Adobe Acrobat Reader
for PDF documents. It seems to me that such new element would be very popular,
especially now that ereaders and ebooks have been made widely available from
companies such as Apple (iPad), Google (Google eBookstore), Amazon (Kindle),
Sony (Sony Reader), and Barnes and Noble (Nook).

Posted from: 98.203.243.109
User agent: Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; MSIE 9.0; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64;
Trident/5.0)

-- 
Configure bugmail: http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/userprefs.cgi?tab=email
------- You are receiving this mail because: -------
You are on the CC list for the bug.
Received on Thursday, 30 June 2011 03:08:36 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Wednesday, 9 May 2012 00:17:33 GMT