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RE: charset attribute on a, link and script elements

From: Richard Ishida <ishida@w3.org>
Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2010 16:16:48 +0100
To: '"Martin J. Dürst"' <duerst@it.aoyama.ac.jp>
Cc: <public-html@w3.org>, <public-i18n-core@w3.org>
Message-ID: <001701cae2f7$fe640e10$fb2c2a30$@org>
Hi Martin,

Yep, I was assuming the same answers as you gave, but I wanted to confirm that I wasn't making incorrect assumptions by hearing it directly from the person/people who wrote the text.

Thanks,
RI

============
Richard Ishida
Internationalization Lead
W3C (World Wide Web Consortium)

http://www.w3.org/International/
http://rishida.net/




> -----Original Message-----
> From: "Martin J. Dürst" [mailto:duerst@it.aoyama.ac.jp]
> Sent: 23 April 2010 12:33
> To: Richard Ishida
> Cc: public-html@w3.org; public-i18n-core@w3.org
> Subject: Re: charset attribute on a, link and script elements
> 
> Hello Richard,
> 
> On 2010/04/22 19:38, Richard Ishida wrote:
> > The HTML5 spec currently says:
> >
> > "The following attributes are obsolete (though the elements are still part of
> the language), and must not be used by authors:
> 
> Shouldn't this say "though the attributes are still"?
> 
> > charset on a elements
> > charset on link elements
> >      Use an HTTP Content-Type header on the linked resource instead."
> >
> > Could someone please explain for me/point me to the thread that gives
> answers to the following questions:
> >
> > 1. Why is charset on link and a deprecated?
> 
> When we put these in with RFC 2070, this was really a stopgap measure
> because the idea of adding charset information to HTTP (and to content)
> was very new and only starting to catch on. It took quite a bit longer
> to catch on than we hoped, but if the HTML5 folks have decided that
> these are no longer needed, they probably have done this based on data
> that they have.
> 
> > 2. Why is charset on script not treated the same way as charset on link?
> 
> Scripts (which in practice means Javascript) don't have a way to
> indicate encoding internally.
> 
> > 3. Why the recommended alternative for charset on link doesn't mention
> in-document declarations such as @charset, especially since http headers are
> not available when the CSS is not read from a server.
> 
> Good question. I think the text should just say "Provide charset
> information with the resource itself" or something similar that is
> independent of the details (HTTP header or wherever), which are given
> elsewhere.
> 
> Regards,   Martin.
> 
> > Thanks,
> > RI
> >
> >
> > PS: In case it saves time for future discussions, you can find some test
> results for use of link and charset on major browsers at
> http://www.w3.org/International/tests/tests-html-css/tests-character-
> encoding/results-css-encoding.
> >
> > ============
> > Richard Ishida
> > Internationalization Lead
> > W3C (World Wide Web Consortium)
> >
> > http://www.w3.org/International/
> > http://rishida.net/
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> 
> --
> #-# Martin J. Dürst, Professor, Aoyama Gakuin University
> #-# http://www.sw.it.aoyama.ac.jp   mailto:duerst@it.aoyama.ac.jp
> 
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Received on Friday, 23 April 2010 15:17:23 GMT

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