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Re: Design Principles

From: Philip Taylor <pjt47@cam.ac.uk>
Date: Mon, 25 May 2009 15:36:42 +0100
Message-ID: <4A1AACFA.6040701@cam.ac.uk>
To: Maciej Stachowiak <mjs@apple.com>
CC: Leif Halvard Silli <lhs@malform.no>, HTML WG <public-html@w3.org>
Maciej Stachowiak wrote:
> 
> On May 25, 2009, at 6:15 AM, Leif Halvard Silli wrote:
> 
>> @profile is widespread amongst authors to the extent that Dublin Core 
>> is widespread.
>>
>> It is a specified MUST for for anyone using Dublin Core to use 
>> @profile [1]. Interpreting the DC properties as DC properties is not 
>> licensed without it [2]. It is not this working group's task to to 
>> "inform" the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative that they don't need it. 
>> In fact DC has two meta data profiles and @profile is needed to tell 
>> which one to use. So, as far as I am concerned, this principle has so 
>> far not had any effect on @profile, even though it should apply.
> 
> If that's true, then probably the most applicable principle would be 
> "Support Existing Content."  But I don't think we have evidence from the 
> above that profile is in fact used a lot. Sounds like it could be, 
> depending on how much Dublin Core is used and whether authors using DC 
> follow the profile requirement.

http://philip.html5.org/data/profile-values.txt - looks like tens of 
people use @profile for DC.

http://philip.html5.org/data/link-rel-rev.txt - looks like hundreds of 
people use rel="schema.DC".

http://philip.html5.org/data/meta-names.txt - looks like thousands of 
people use <meta name="DC.*">.

So, people don't seem to follow the profile requirement much.

(Further interpretation of the data is left as an exercise for the reader.)

-- 
Philip Taylor
pjt47@cam.ac.uk
Received on Monday, 25 May 2009 14:37:23 GMT

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