W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-html@w3.org > November 2008

Re: An HTML language specification vs. a browser specification

From: Maciej Stachowiak <mjs@apple.com>
Date: Thu, 20 Nov 2008 02:06:12 -0800
To: "Roy T. Fielding" <fielding@gbiv.com>
Cc: Ian Hickson <ian@hixie.ch>, HTML WG <public-html@w3.org>
Message-id: <FE9500EA-0DFB-404C-9DB1-AFED391B8DE2@apple.com>


On Nov 19, 2008, at 5:58 PM, Roy T. Fielding wrote:

>
> On Nov 18, 2008, at 2:10 AM, Ian Hickson wrote:
>>
>> I have had the opposite feedback from hundreds of other people, far  
>> more
>> than a dozen. Why should I ignore the majority in favour of the  
>> minority,
>> especially when the majority has a more technically sound and more
>> logically argued position?
>
> Because I have more experience with the Web and its protocols and
> the wide variety of implementations than just about anyone else you
> will talk to, and I can tell the difference between a technically
> sound argument and wishful thinking.  I don't have as much time
> available to spend on HTML5 as others and I don't have access to
> a magical pot of statistics that let me claim things about spider
> traces as if they were relevant to actual decisions, but I do have
> a real job that actually depends on a Web that works according to
> real software engineering principles and an extensive set of
> implementations that shows I am not talking out of my ass.
>
> I am sure the wave of fanboys will start crying about my use
> of argument by authority, but quite frankly I don't care any more.
> Let them demonstrate by deploying implementations, not opinions.

Do browsers count as implementations? Previously you implied that the  
input of browser vendors should not be given significant weight. Is  
only the particular kind of software you work on relevant to HTML  
expertise?

Regards,
Maciej
Received on Thursday, 20 November 2008 10:06:52 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Wednesday, 9 May 2012 00:16:24 GMT