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Re: Request for clarification of the case where 'the image isn't discussed by the surrounding text, but it has some relevance'

From: Steven Faulkner <faulkner.steve@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Aug 2008 14:33:37 +0100
Message-ID: <55687cf80808180633k776c01b9j563d217f912adf54@mail.gmail.com>
To: "James Graham" <jg307@cam.ac.uk>
Cc: "Ian Hickson" <ian@hixie.ch>, "W3C WAI-XTECH" <wai-xtech@w3.org>, "public-html@w3.org WG" <public-html@w3.org>

Thanks for your interpretation Jgraham, sounds logical, too bad its
not definitive.



regards
stevef

2008/8/18 James Graham <jg307@cam.ac.uk>:
> Steven Faulkner wrote:
>>
>> The HTML5 spec currently states [1]:
>>
>> "In some cases, the image isn't discussed by the surrounding text, but
>> it has some relevance. Such images are decorative, but still form part
>> of the content. In these cases, the alt attribute must be present but
>> its value must be the empty string.
>
> My understanding (and I'm sure someone will tell me if I am wrong) is that
> the current conformance requirements are designed so that the transformation
> <img alt=$x> -> $x
>
> preserves the semantics of the page (except in the case where x begins with
> { and ends with }) i.e. the meaning should be invariant under a script like
>
> javascript:(function(){var%20img_nodes=document.getElementsByTagName('img');while%20(img_nodes.length)%20{var%20img%20=%20img_nodes[0];var%20replacement%20=%20document.createTextNode(img.alt);img.parentNode.replaceChild(replacement,%20img);}})()
>
> (that should, in theory work as a bookmarklet, but I may have got something
> wrong, it is only very very lightly tested).
>
>> So would the example below be non-conforming?
>
>>
>>
>> <h1>The Lady of Shalott</h1>
>> <p><img src="shalott.jpeg" alt="Painting of woman in a small boat on a
>> river in the countryside. A tapestry trails behind her in the water
>> and there is a lantern, candles and a crucifix on the prow of the
>> boat. She wears a white dress and has long loose hair."></p>
>> <p>On either side the river lie<br>
>> Long fields of barley and of rye,<br>
>> That clothe the wold and meet the sky;<br>
>> And through the field the road run by<br>
>> To many-tower'd Camelot;<br>
>> And up and down the people go,<br>
>> Gazing where the lilies blow<br>
>> Round an island there below,<br>
>> The island of Shalott.</p>"
>
> Given the design principle above, this is clearly non-conforming as it
> implies that the text
>
> "Painting of woman in a small boat on a river in the countryside. A tapestry
> rails behind her in the water and there is a lantern, candles and a crucifix
> on the prow of the boat. She wears a white dress and has long loose hair."
>
> is part of the poem. In this case it is likely that a user would figure out
> what is going on but in the case of a piece of prose or a play, alt text
> describing a decorative image could easily be confused with actual content
> of the surrounding piece.
>
> --
> "Eternity's a terrible thought. I mean, where's it all going to end?"
>  -- Tom Stoppard, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead
>



-- 
with regards

Steve Faulkner
Technical Director - TPG Europe
Director - Web Accessibility Tools Consortium

www.paciellogroup.com | www.wat-c.org
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Received on Monday, 18 August 2008 13:34:13 GMT

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