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Re: screen-reader versus self-voicing app (was: Re: Screen-reader behaviour)

From: Marghanita da Cruz <marghanita@ramin.com.au>
Date: Fri, 14 Sep 2007 12:07:06 +1000
Message-ID: <46E9ECCA.6010703@ramin.com.au>
To: Charles McCathieNevile <chaals@opera.com>
CC: "public-html@w3.org" <public-html@w3.org>

Charles McCathieNevile wrote:
<snip>
> It is important to remember that there are a lot of different use cases 
> competing in accessibility (there are relatively few people who have 
> ever come across deaf-blind computer users and know how they work with 
> the web, and I am pretty surprised that even the brightest dyslexic 
> people I know manage to follow enough of this group to contribute to 
> it). When we get input from deaf users and deafness experts (people who 
> know what they are talkiong about and have tested it), it will get even 
> more interesting, I suspect...

The focus in the hearing impaired community has been on TV to date.
<http://www.deafnessforum.org.au/capqual_campaign.htm>

With regard to the Linux stuff and other multiuser operating systems, the 
architecture is quite different - it is multi user and you can have dedicated 
special devices connected - in the old days we called them terminals.

I attended  a presentation by a blind speaker about the Accessibility of Linux. 
The discussion was whether messages at startup etc were useful. The speaker 
pointed out that as with a sighted person, they like to know what their computer 
is doing. On this note, the topic of accessibility of authoring tools is 
something worth bearing in mind.

M
-- 
Marghanita da Cruz
http://www.ramin.com.au
Phone: (+61)0414 869202
Received on Friday, 14 September 2007 02:08:18 UTC

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