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Re: Use Cases for The <canvas> Element

From: Lee Kowalkowski <lee.kowalkowski@googlemail.com>
Date: Sun, 29 Jul 2007 21:39:42 +0100
Message-ID: <610592c90707291339h7a2daa5dx580eea70ae8f1051@mail.gmail.com>
To: "Philip Taylor (Webmaster)" <P.Taylor@rhul.ac.uk>
Cc: "Lachlan Hunt" <lachlan.hunt@lachy.id.au>, public-html <public-html@w3.org>

On 29/07/07, Philip Taylor (Webmaster) <P.Taylor@rhul.ac.uk> wrote:
> Lachlan Hunt wrote:
> > Users want an increasingly dynamic and interactive experience on the
> > web.  Providing dynamic graphics is one way in which this can be
> > achieved.  So by providing examples where dynamic and interactive
> > graphics have been used in the past, demonstrates the need for canvas.
>
> No, it does not.  Following your own insistence that WG members
> focus on the /problem/ rather than on potential solutions,
> "examples where dynamic and interactive graphics have been used
> in the past" demonstrate the need for "dynamic and interactive
> graphics".  They do /not/ demonstrate a need for "canvas",
> which is (one of many possible) solutions.
>
> Philip Taylor

Good point.  I would have been more at ease if all the behaviour of
the canvas element were applied to the existing img element instead.
I never understood the rationale for a completely new element.

-- 
Lee
Received on Sunday, 29 July 2007 20:39:44 UTC

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