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Re: 3.1 Introduction (Draft)

From: Olivier GENDRIN <olivier.gendrin@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Jul 2007 12:29:06 +0200
Message-ID: <e2c275120707160329k1a08d234l18a38c3d7df26cfd@mail.gmail.com>
To: "HTML WG" <public-html@w3.org>

On 7/15/07, Debi Orton <oradnio@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> This is my draft of the content for 3.1, described as "An
> introduction to marking up a document."  I offer it as a starting point.

Thanks !

> Elements are paired,

Are generally paired.

> meaning that in order to apply an element to a
> section of information within the document, the section must begin
> with an opening element tag (e.g., <p>) and must end with a closing
> element tag (e.g., </p>).  Some elements also have mandatory
> attributes, such as the <img> element's src attribute that indicates
> the location from which an image is to be loaded, or the type
> attribute of the <script> element.
>
> There are exceptions to the opening/closing element model, primarily
> for elements that are self-contained, such as the element describing
> the document's metadata (<meta>), the <link> element, and the line
> break element (<br>).  For these single elements, a slash is inserted
> just before the element's closing angle bracket (e.g., <br />).

What about <img /> ?

You should insert the second paragraph inside the first :


Elements are generally paired, meaning that in order to apply an element to a
section of information within the document, the section must begin
with an opening element tag (e.g., <p>) and must end with a closing
element tag (e.g., </p>).

There are exceptions to the opening/closing element model, primarily
for elements that are self-contained, such as the element describing
the document's metadata (<meta>), the <link> element, and the line
break element (<br>).  For these single elements, a slash is inserted
just before the element's closing angle bracket (e.g., <br />).

Some elements also have mandatory
attributes, such as the <img> element's "src" attribute that indicates
the location from which an image is to be loaded, or the "type"
attribute of the <script> element.


-- 
Olivier G.
http://www.lespacedunmatin.info/blog/
Received on Monday, 16 July 2007 10:29:12 UTC

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