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html5/alt-techniques Overview.html,1.56,1.57

From: Steven Faulkners via cvs-syncmail <cvsmail@w3.org>
Date: Thu, 28 Oct 2010 15:28:31 +0000
To: public-html-commits@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1PBUP1-0008Nq-Kk@lionel-hutz.w3.org>
Update of /sources/public/html5/alt-techniques
In directory hutz:/tmp/cvs-serv32209

Modified Files:
	Overview.html 
Log Message:
updates based on Gez's comments

Index: Overview.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/public/html5/alt-techniques/Overview.html,v
retrieving revision 1.56
retrieving revision 1.57
diff -u -d -r1.56 -r1.57
--- Overview.html	19 Oct 2010 12:37:07 -0000	1.56
+++ Overview.html	28 Oct 2010 15:28:29 -0000	1.57
@@ -158,7 +158,7 @@
  </head>
 <body>
 <div class="head"><p><a href="http://www.w3.org/"><img width="72" height="48" src="http://www.w3.org/Icons/w3c_home" alt="W3C"></a></p><h1 class="title" id="title">HTML5:  Techniques for providing useful text alternatives</h1>
-<h2 id="w3c-working-draft-05-may-2010"><acronym title="World Wide Web Consortium">W3C</acronym> Editor's Draft 19 October 2010</h2>
+<h2 id="w3c-working-draft-05-may-2010"><acronym title="World Wide Web Consortium">W3C</acronym> Editor's Draft 28 October 2010</h2>
 <dl><!-- <dt>This version:</dt>
 <dd><a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2010/WD-html-alt-techniques-20100624/">http://www.w3.org/TR/2010/WD-html-alt-techniques-20100624/</a></dd><dt>Latest published version:</dt> -->
   <!-- <dd><A href="http://www.w3.org/TR/html-alt-techniques/">http://www.w3.org/TR/html-alt-techniques/</A> </dd> --><dt>Latest editor's draft:</dt><dd><a href="http://dev.w3.org/html5/alt-techniques/">http://dev.w3.org/html5/alt-techniques/</a></dd>
@@ -242,7 +242,7 @@
 <h2 id="intro">Introduction</h2>
 <H3 id="text-alt">Text Alternatives</H3>
 <p><A href="http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/#text-altdef">Text alternatives</A> are   a primary way of making visual information accessible, because they can be rendered   through any sensory modality (for example, visual, auditory or tactile) to match   the needs of the user. Providing text alternatives allows the information to be   rendered in a variety of ways by a variety of user agents. For example, a person   who cannot see a picture can have the text alternative read aloud using   synthesized speech.</p>
-<p>To determine appropriate <A href="http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/#text-altdef">text alternatives</A> it is   important to think about why an image is being included in a document. What is   its purpose? Thinking like this will help you to understand what is important   about the image for the page's intended audience. Every image has a reason for   being on a page because it either provides useful information, performs a   function, or enhances aesthetics. Therefore, knowing what the image is for,   makes writing appropriate <A href="http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/#text-altdef">text alternatives</A> easier.</p>
+<p>To determine appropriate <A href="http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/#text-altdef">text alternatives</A> it is   important to think about why an image is being included in a document. What is   its purpose? Thinking like this will help you to understand what is important   about the image for the page's intended audience. Every image has a reason for   being on a page, because it  provides useful information, performs a   function, or enhances aesthetics. Therefore, knowing what the image is for,   makes writing appropriate <A href="http://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20/#text-altdef">text alternatives</A> easier.</p>
 <h3 id="example-benefits">Examples of scenarios where users benefit from text alternatives for images</h3>
 <ul>
   <li>They have a very slow connection and are browsing with images disabled.</li>
@@ -253,6 +253,7 @@
   <li> They are listening to
     the page being read out by a  voice Web
     browser.</li>
+  <li>They have images disabled to save on download costs.</li>
 </ul>
 <h3 id="good-practices">General Text Alternative Good Practices</h3>
 <UL>
@@ -414,7 +415,8 @@
 &lt;ul&gt;
 &lt;li&gt;&lt;a href="red.html"&gt;&lt;img src="red.jpeg" <strong>alt="Red"</strong>&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/li&gt;
 &lt;li&gt;&lt;a href="green.html"&gt;&lt;img src="green.jpeg" <strong>alt="Green"</strong>&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/li&gt;
-&lt;li&gt;&lt;a href="blue.html"&gt;&lt;img src="blue.jpeg" <strong>alt="Blue"</strong>&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/li&gt;&lt;/ul&gt;</pre>
+&lt;li&gt;&lt;a href="blue.html"&gt;&lt;img src="blue.jpeg" <strong>alt="Blue"</strong>&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/li&gt;
+&lt;/ul&gt;</pre>
 </div>
 <h4 id="hac">Example 1.2</h4>
 <div class="example">
@@ -576,7 +578,7 @@
   <li><a href="http://www.webaim.org/techniques/images/longdesc.php">Creating Accessible Images: Long Descriptions</a> (WebAIM tutorial)</li>
 </ul>
 <h3 id="img-of-text">3. Images of text</h3>
-<p>Sometimes, an image only contains  text, and the purpose of the image is to display text  using visual effects and /or fonts. While it is <em>strongly</em> recommended that text styled using CSS be used, but if this is not possible, in most of these cases, the content of the <code title="attr-img-alt">alt</code> attribute SHOULD consist of the same text as written in the image itself. </p>
+<p>Sometimes, an image only contains  text, and the purpose of the image is to display text  using visual effects and /or fonts.  It is <em>strongly</em> recommended that text styled using CSS be used, but if this is not possible, in most of these cases, the content of the <code title="attr-img-alt">alt</code> attribute SHOULD consist of the same text as written in the image itself. </p>
 <h4 id="hai">Example 3.1</h4>
 <div class="example">
   <!-- <p>Consider this <a href="images/text.gif">image</a>  containing the text "Get Happy!" it uses a non standard font and uses multiple colors. The text is
Received on Thursday, 28 October 2010 15:28:33 GMT

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