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html5/alt-techniques Overview.html,1.19,1.20

From: Steven Faulkners via cvs-syncmail <cvsmail@w3.org>
Date: Fri, 23 Apr 2010 15:40:58 +0000
To: public-html-commits@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1O5Kzy-0005WN-CG@lionel-hutz.w3.org>
Update of /sources/public/html5/alt-techniques
In directory hutz:/tmp/cvs-serv21209

Modified Files:
	Overview.html 
Log Message:
typos and tweeks to the alt attribute technique section

Index: Overview.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/public/html5/alt-techniques/Overview.html,v
retrieving revision 1.19
retrieving revision 1.20
diff -u -d -r1.19 -r1.20
--- Overview.html	23 Apr 2010 15:08:11 -0000	1.19
+++ Overview.html	23 Apr 2010 15:40:56 -0000	1.20
@@ -314,7 +314,7 @@
 <hr>
 <h2 id="methods">Methods for Providing Text Alternatives</h2>
 <h3 id="altmethod">The <code>img</code> element <code>alt</code> attribute</h3>
-<p>The primary method for providing text alternatives for images is by including text in the  <code>img</code> element <code>alt</code> attribute.  In graphical   browsers the content of the alt attribute is typically displayed along with an indication (bordered area and/or an image icon) of the presence of an image when the image is not displayed, because the user has disabled image display or the image source information is incorrect. Assistive technologies such as screen readers will typically announce the presence of an image followed by the alt attribute content. Text based browsers  may display the alt attribute content  in brackets or in  different colored text or as the content of a link to the image or as text without any indication of the image a prefixed with an indication of the image.</p>
+<p>The primary method for providing text alternatives for images is by including text in the  <code>img</code> element <code>alt</code> attribute.  In graphical   browsers the content of the alt attribute is typically displayed along with an indication (bordered area and/or an image icon) of the presence of an image when the image is not displayed, because the user has disabled image display or the image source information is incorrect. Assistive technologies such as screen readers will typically announce the presence of an image followed by the alt attribute content. Text based browsers  may display the alt attribute content  in brackets or in  different colored text or as the content of a link to the image or as text without any indication of the image or  prefixed with an indication of the image.</p>
 <p><strong>Example:</strong></p>
 <pre>&lt;img src="example.jpg" <strong>alt="Alternative text."</strong>&gt;</pre>
 <h5>Advantages:</h5>
@@ -327,7 +327,7 @@
 <ul>
   <li>Content of the alt attribute is not available to some users who may find it useful.</li>
   <li>If the alt attribute content is too long it may cause display issues in some browsers.</li>
-  <li>If the alt attribute content is too long it may cause raeding issues in some assistive technologies.</li>
+  <li>If the alt attribute content is too long it may cause reading issues in some assistive technologies.</li>
   <li>Semantic structure cannot be added to alt attribute content.</li>
 </ul>
 <h6>How long should a short text alternative be?</h6>
@@ -336,7 +336,7 @@
 <p><span class="note">to do</span></p>
 <h5>Advantages:</h5>
 <ul>
-  <li>When supported by browsers and assistive technology the content of the figcaption will explicitly associated with the image.</li>
+  <li>When supported by browsers and assistive technology the content of the <code>figcaption</code> will be explicitly associated with the image.</li>
 </ul>
 <h5>Disadvantages:</h5>
 <ul>
Received on Friday, 23 April 2010 15:40:59 GMT

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