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html5/spec Overview.html,1.2314,1.2315

From: Ian Hickson via cvs-syncmail <cvsmail@w3.org>
Date: Mon, 01 Jun 2009 20:09:43 +0000
To: public-html-commits@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1MBDpH-0001sS-S3@lionel-hutz.w3.org>
Update of /sources/public/html5/spec
In directory hutz:/tmp/cvs-serv7180

Modified Files:
	Overview.html 
Log Message:
Try to be a little more consistent about typographical use. (bug 6770) (whatwg r3161)

Index: Overview.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/public/html5/spec/Overview.html,v
retrieving revision 1.2314
retrieving revision 1.2315
diff -u -d -r1.2314 -r1.2315
--- Overview.html	1 Jun 2009 19:49:16 -0000	1.2314
+++ Overview.html	1 Jun 2009 20:09:40 -0000	1.2315
@@ -1360,12 +1360,12 @@
   that element, attribute, or API are marked up like <code title="x-that"><a href="#x-that">this</a></code>.<p>Other code fragments are marked up <code title="">like
   this</code>.<p>Variables are marked up like <var title="">this</var>.<p class="impl">This is an implementation requirement.<h2 id="infrastructure"><span class="secno">2 </span>Common infrastructure</h2><h3 id="terminology"><span class="secno">2.1 </span>Terminology</h3><p>This specification refers to both HTML and XML attributes and DOM
   attributes, often in the same context. When it is not clear which is
-  being referred to, they are referred to as <dfn id="content-attributes">content
-  attributes</dfn> for HTML and XML attributes, and <dfn id="dom-attributes">DOM
+  being referred to, they are referred to as <dfn title="">content
+  attributes</dfn> for HTML and XML attributes, and <dfn title="">DOM
   attributes</dfn> for those from the DOM. Similarly, the term
   "properties" is used for both JavaScript object properties and CSS
-  properties. When these are ambiguous they are qualified as object
-  properties and CSS properties respectively.<p>The term <a href="#html-documents">HTML documents</a> is sometimes used in
+  properties. When these are ambiguous they are qualified as <dfn title="">object properties</dfn> and <dfn title="">CSS properties
+  respectively</dfn>.<p>The term <a href="#html-documents">HTML documents</a> is sometimes used in
   contrast with <a href="#xml-documents">XML documents</a> to specifically mean
   documents that were parsed using an <a href="#html-parser">HTML parser</a> (as
   opposed to using an <a href="#xml-parser">XML parser</a> or created purely
@@ -1373,14 +1373,14 @@
   to HTML or XHTML, it also includes the other. When a feature
   specifically only applies to one of the two languages, it is called
   out by explicitly stating that it does not apply to the other
-  format, as in "for HTML, ... (this does not apply to XHTML)".<p>This specification uses the term <i>document</i> to
+  format, as in "for HTML, ... (this does not apply to XHTML)".<p>This specification uses the term <dfn title="">document</dfn> to
   refer to any use of HTML, ranging from short static documents to
   long essays or reports with rich multimedia, as well as to
-  fully-fledged interactive applications.<p>For simplicity, terms such as <i>shown</i>, <i>displayed</i>,
-  and <i>visible</i> might sometimes be used when referring to the
-  way a document is rendered to the user. These terms are not meant to
-  imply a visual medium; they must be considered to apply to other
-  media in equivalent ways.<p>When an algorithm B says to return to another algorithm A, it
+  fully-fledged interactive applications.<p>For simplicity, terms such as <dfn title="">shown</dfn>, <dfn title="">displayed</dfn>, and <dfn title="">visible</dfn> might
+  sometimes be used when referring to the way a document is rendered
+  to the user. These terms are not meant to imply a visual medium;
+  they must be considered to apply to other media in equivalent
+  ways.<p>When an algorithm B says to return to another algorithm A, it
   implies that A called B. Upon returning to A, the implementation
   must continue from where it left off in calling B.<h4 id="xml"><span class="secno">2.1.1 </span>XML</h4><p id="html-namespace">To ease migration from HTML to XHTML, UAs
   conforming to this specification will place elements in HTML in the
@@ -1431,13 +1431,13 @@
   or <code title="">CDATA_SECTION_NODE</code> (4). <a href="#references">[DOM3CORE]</a><h4 id="scripting-0"><span class="secno">2.1.3 </span>Scripting</h4><p>The construction "a <code>Foo</code> object", where
   <code>Foo</code> is actually an interface, is sometimes used instead
   of the more accurate "an object implementing the interface
-  <code>Foo</code>".<p>A DOM attribute is said to be <i>getting</i> when its value is
+  <code>Foo</code>".<p>A DOM attribute is said to be <dfn title="">getting</dfn> when its value is
   being retrieved (e.g. by author script), and is said to be
-  <i>setting</i> when a new value is assigned to it.<p>If a DOM object is said to be <dfn id="live">live</dfn>, then that means
+  <dfn title="">setting</dfn> when a new value is assigned to it.<p>If a DOM object is said to be <dfn id="live">live</dfn>, then that means
   that any attributes returning that object <span class="impl">must</span> always return the same object (not a new
   object each time), and the attributes and methods on that object
   <span class="impl">must</span> operate on the actual underlying
-  data, not a snapshot of the data.<p>The terms <i>fire</i> and <i>dispatch</i> are used
+  data, not a snapshot of the data.<p>The terms <dfn title="">fire</dfn> and <dfn title="">dispatch</dfn> are used
   interchangeably in the context of events, as in the DOM Events
   specifications. <a href="#references">[DOM3EVENTS]</a><h4 id="plugins"><span class="secno">2.1.4 </span>Plugins</h4><p>The term <dfn id="plugin">plugin</dfn> is used to mean any content handler,
   typically a third-party content handler, for Web content types that
@@ -1463,7 +1463,7 @@
   the set 0x09, 0x0A, 0x0C, 0x0D, 0x20 - 0x22, 0x26, 0x27, 0x2C -
   0x3F, 0x41 - 0x5A, and 0x61 - 0x7A<!-- is that list ok? do any
   character sets we want to support do things outside that range?
-  -->. <!-- XXX #refs RFC1345 ? --><h4 id="resources"><span class="secno">2.1.6 </span>Resources</h4><p>The specification uses the term <i>supported</i> when referring
+  -->. <!-- XXX #refs RFC1345 ? --><h4 id="resources"><span class="secno">2.1.6 </span>Resources</h4><p>The specification uses the term <dfn title="">supported</dfn> when referring
   to whether a user agent has an implementation capable of decoding
   the semantics of an external resource. A format or type is said to
   be <i>supported</i> if the implementation can process an external
@@ -50823,12 +50823,12 @@
   history</a> consists of batches of one or more of the
   following:</p>
 
-  <ul><li>Changes to the <a href="#content-attributes">content attributes</a> of an
-   <code>Element</code> node.</li>
+  <ul><li>Changes to the content attributes of an <code>Element</code>
+   node.</li>
 
-   <li>Changes to the <a href="#dom-attributes">DOM attributes</a> of a
-   <code>Node</code>.</li> <!-- XXX uh, these change on their own, so
-   clearly this isn't going to fly. Which DOM attributes, exactly? -->
+   <li>Changes to the DOM attributes of a <code>Node</code>.</li> <!--
+   XXX uh, these change on their own, so clearly this isn't going to
+   fly. Which DOM attributes, exactly? -->
 
    <li>Changes to the DOM hierarchy of nodes that are descendants of
    the <code><a href="#htmldocument">HTMLDocument</a></code> object (<code>parentNode</code>,
@@ -64676,6 +64676,7 @@
   Martin Kutschker,
   Masataka Yakura,
   Mathieu Henri,
+  Matt Schmidt,
   Matt Wright,
   Matthew Gregan,
   Matthew Mastracci,
Received on Monday, 1 June 2009 20:09:50 GMT

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