W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-html-commits@w3.org > January 2009

html5/html-author Overview.html,1.20,1.21 Overview.src.html,1.22,1.23

From: Lachlan Hunt via cvs-syncmail <cvsmail@w3.org>
Date: Thu, 29 Jan 2009 14:50:12 +0000
To: public-html-commits@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1LSYDc-0006nn-En@lionel-hutz.w3.org>

Update of /sources/public/html5/html-author
In directory hutz:/tmp/cvs-serv26131

Modified Files:
	Overview.html Overview.src.html 
Log Message:
Renamed the guide, merged introduction sections together, moved How To Read section to end

Index: Overview.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/public/html5/html-author/Overview.html,v
retrieving revision 1.20
retrieving revision 1.21
diff -u -d -r1.20 -r1.21
--- Overview.html	29 Jan 2009 13:40:37 -0000	1.20
+++ Overview.html	29 Jan 2009 14:50:10 -0000	1.21
@@ -1,6 +1,6 @@
 <!DOCTYPE html><html lang=en-AU><head>
 	<meta charset=UTF-8>
-	<title>The Web Developer’s Guide to HTML 5</title>
+	<title>HTML 5 Reference</title>
 	<style type=text/css>
 	.element { margin: 1em 0 ; padding: 0 0 0.25em; }
 
@@ -31,7 +31,8 @@
 <div class=head>
 	<header>
 		<!--begin-logo--><p><a href=http://www.w3.org/><img alt=W3C src=http://www.w3.org/Icons/w3c_home></a></p><!--end-logo-->
-		<h1>The Web Developer’s Guide to HTML 5</h1>
+		<h1>HTML 5 Reference</h1>
+		<h2 class="no-num no-toc">A Web Developer’s Guide to HTML 5</h2>
 		<h2 class="no-num no-toc">W3C Editor’s Draft 29 January 2009</h2>
 
 		<dl>
@@ -69,8 +70,7 @@
 	<p>This document is an Editors Draft of “The Web Developer’s Guide to HTML 5”
 	   produced by the <a href=http://www.w3.org/html/wg/>HTML Working Group</a>,
 	   part of the <a href=http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/Activity>HTML Activity</a>.
-	   The working group is working on a new version of HTML not yet published
-	   under TR. In the meantime, you can access the
+	   The working group is working on HTML 5. In the meantime, you can access the
 	   <a href=http://www.w3.org/html/wg/html5/>HTML 5 Editor's draft</a>.
 	   The appropriate forum for comments on this document is
 	   <a href=mailto:public-html-comments@w3.org>public-html-comments@w3.org</a>
@@ -99,95 +99,157 @@
 	
 <!--begin-toc-->
 <ol class=toc>
- <li><a href=#introduction><span class=secno>1 </span>Introduction</a>
+ <li><a href=#introduction><span class=secno>1 </span>Introduction</a></li>
+ <li><a href=#introductory-tutorial><span class=secno>2 </span>Introductory Tutorial</a>
   <ol class=toc>
-   <li><a href=#scope><span class=secno>1.1 </span>Scope</a></li>
-   <li><a href=#intended-audience><span class=secno>1.2 </span>Intended Audience</a></li>
-   <li><a href=#overview><span class=secno>1.3 </span>Overview</a></li></ol></li>
- <li><a href=#how-to-read-this-guide><span class=secno>2 </span>How to Read This Guide</a>
+   <li><a href=#understanding-semantics><span class=secno>2.1 </span>Understanding Semantics</a></li></ol></li>
+ <li><a href=#the-html-and-xhtml-syntax><span class=secno>3 </span>The HTML and XHTML Syntax</a>
   <ol class=toc>
-   <li><a href=#conventions><span class=secno>2.1 </span>Conventions</a>
+   <li><a href=#html><span class=secno>3.1 </span>HTML</a></li></ol></li>
+ <li><a href=#the-html-vocabulary-and-apis><span class=secno>4 </span>The HTML Vocabulary and APIs</a></li>
+ <li><a href=#how-to-read-this-guide><span class=secno>5 </span>How to Read This Guide</a>
+  <ol class=toc>
+   <li><a href=#conventions><span class=secno>5.1 </span>Conventions</a>
     <ol class=toc>
-     <li><a href=#notes,-tips-and-warnings><span class=secno>2.1.1 </span>Notes, Tips and Warnings</a></li>
-     <li><a href=#example-markup><span class=secno>2.1.2 </span>Example Markup</a>
+     <li><a href=#notes,-tips-and-warnings><span class=secno>5.1.1 </span>Notes, Tips and Warnings</a></li>
+     <li><a href=#example-markup><span class=secno>5.1.2 </span>Example Markup</a>
       <ol class=toc>
-       <li><a href=#attributes><span class=secno>2.1.2.1 </span>Attributes</a></li>
-       <li><a href=#void-elements><span class=secno>2.1.2.2 </span>Void Elements</a></li>
-       <li><a href=#namespaces><span class=secno>2.1.2.3 </span>Namespaces</a></li></ol></li></ol></li></ol></li>
- <li><a href=#preface><span class=secno>3 </span>Preface</a>
-  <ol class=toc>
-   <li><a href=#understanding-semantics><span class=secno>3.1 </span>Understanding Semantics</a></li></ol></li>
- <li><a href=#introductory-tutorial><span class=secno>4 </span>Introductory Tutorial</a></li>
- <li><a href=#the-html-and-xhtml-syntax><span class=secno>5 </span>The HTML and XHTML Syntax</a></li>
- <li><a href=#the-html-vocabulary-and-apis><span class=secno>6 </span>The HTML Vocabulary and APIs</a></li></ol>
+       <li><a href=#attributes><span class=secno>5.1.2.1 </span>Attributes</a></li>
+       <li><a href=#void-elements><span class=secno>5.1.2.2 </span>Void Elements</a></li>
+       <li><a href=#namespaces><span class=secno>5.1.2.3 </span>Namespaces</a></li></ol></li></ol></li></ol></li></ol>
 <!--end-toc-->
 </section>
 
 <section>
 	<h2 id=introduction><span class=secno>1 </span>Introduction</h2>
 	
-	<section>
-		<h3 id=scope><span class=secno>1.1 </span>Scope</h3>
-		<p>This document is intended to provide a reference guide explaining the
-		   conforming HTML vocabulary and its associated scripting APIs.
-		   Guidance will be provided in regard to the correct and incorrect
-		   usage of semantic elements. Both HTML and XHTML will be explained in
-		   depth, including illustrating their differences and similarities,
-		   both syntactically and the effect of each upon the DOM APIs.</p>
-	</section>
+	<p>This document serves as a reference guide for the HTML syntax,
+	   vocabulary and its associated DOM APIs and is intended for web site
+	   and application developers, publishers, tutorial writers and teachers
+	   and their students. That is, people who write documents using HTML,
+	   or who teach others to do so. This guide is structured into three
+	   major sections.</p>
+
+	<p>The first provides an introductory tutorial on writing HTML,
+	   explaining the basic structure and syntax of an HTML document,
+	   covering the fundamental techniques and best practices, encouraging
+	   the use of clean and valid markup, and the use of quality assurance
+	   tools.</p>
+
+	<p>The second section provides an in depth look at the syntax of HTML
+	   and XHTML documents.  This will investigate both the similarities and
+	   differences between the two alternatives and provides guidance on
+	   choosing which to use for your own projects, depending on your needs.
+	   Additionally, this will also provide details about creating polyglot
+	   documents — that is, documents that conform to both
+	   HTML and XHTML simultaneiously — including issues
+	   related to ensuring stylesheets and scripts work correctly under both
+	   conditions.</p>
 	
+	<p>The third and final section provides a reference for the HTML
+	   vocabulary.  Each element is described, providing details about its
+	   its meaning, allowed attributes, content models and DOM APIs.  Each
+	   is accompanied by clear examples illustrating how the element is
+	   designed to be used for a range of different use cases.</p>
+</section>
+
+<section>
+	<h2 id=introductory-tutorial><span class=secno>2 </span>Introductory Tutorial</h2>
+
+	<p>The most common format for publishing documents on the web and creating
+	   web applications is HTML.  From its beginning as a relatively simple
+	   language primarily designed for describing scientific documents, it has
+	   grown and adapted to a wide variety needs ranging from publishing news
+	   and blogs, to providing the foundation for full blown applications for
+	   email, maps, word processing and spreadsheets.</p>
+
+	<p>As the uses of HTML have grown, the demands placed upon it by authors
+	   have increased and the limitations of HTML become more pronounced.
+	   HTML 5 is attempting to fill these limitations with new features designed
+	   specifically the address the needs of authors.</p>
+
+	<p>However, the way the HTML5 specification is written is very much targeted
+	   towards implementers rather than web designers and developers, making it
+	   more difficult to read and understand. This document is intended to meet
+	   the needs of web developers by focussing on document conformance criteria
+	   and authoring guidelines.</p>
+
+	<p>Authors who are familiar with previous versions of HTML are advised to
+	   familiarise themselves with <a href=http://www.w3.org/TR/html5-diff/>the differences from HTML 4</a> [HTML4DIFF]</p>
+
 	<section>
-		<h3 id=intended-audience><span class=secno>1.2 </span>Intended Audience</h3>
-		<p>This document is primarily intended for web site and application
-		   developers, publishers, tutorial writers and teachers and their
-		   students. That is, people who write documents using HTML, or who
-		   teach others to do so. Additionally, authoring and quality assurance
-		   tool developers may find its content useful for incorporating into
-		   their products in the form of help, references and examples intended
-		   to assist users with understanding and using the language.</p>
+		<h3 id=understanding-semantics><span class=secno>2.1 </span>Understanding Semantics</h3>
+
+		<p>In general, the purpose of writing and publishing a document is to convey
+		   information to the readers.  This could be any kind of information, such
+		   as telling a story, reporting news and current affairs or describing
+		   available products and services.  Whatever the information is, it needs
+		   to be conveyed to the reader in a way that can be easily understood.</p>
+
+		<p>A typical document, such as an book, news article, blog entry or letter
+		   is often grouped into different sections containing a variety of
+		   headings, paragraphs, lists, tables, quotes and various other
+		   typographical structures.  All of these structures are important for more
+		   easily conveying information to the reader and thus authors need a way to
+		   clearly identify each of these structures in a way that can then be
+		   easily presented to the user.  This is the purpose of markup.</p>
+
+		<p>Markup is a machine readable language that describes aspects of a
+		   document such as its structure, semantics and/or style. Some markup
+		   languages are designed solely for the purpose of describing the
+		   presentation of the document, such as RTF (Rich Text Format). Others,
+		   such as HTML, are more generic and rather than focussing on describing
+		   the presentation, they are designed to focus on describing the meaning or
+		   purpose of the content and leave the presentation for another layer to
+		   deal with.</p>
+
+		<p>HTML provides a wide variety of semantic elements that can be used to
+		   mark up various common typographical structures.  There are heading
+		   elements for marking up different levels of headings, a paragraph (p)
+		   element for paragraph, various list elements for marking up different
+		   types of lists, and a table elements for marking up tables.</p>
+
+		<p>It's important to distinguish between the structure and semantics of
+		   content, which should be described using HTML, and its presentation. In
+		   one document, a heading may be presented visually in a large bold
+		   typeface with wide margins above and below to separate it from the
+		   surrounding content and make it stand out.  In another document, a
+		   heading may be presented in a light coloured, italic, fancy script
+		   typeface.  But regardless of the presentation, it's still a heading and
+		   the markup can still uses the same basic elements for identifying common
+		   structures.</p>
 	</section>
-	
-	<section>
-		<h3 id=overview><span class=secno>1.3 </span>Overview</h3>
-		<p>This document serves as a reference guide for the HTML syntax,
-		   vocabulary and its associated DOM APIs. This guide is structured into
-		   three major sections.</p>
+</section>
 
-		<p>The first provides an introductory tutorial on writing HTML,
-		   explaining the basic structure and syntax of an HTML document,
-		   covering the fundamental techniques and best practices, encouraging
-		   the use of clean and valid markup, and the use of quality assurance
-		   tools.</p>
 
-		<p>The second section provides an in depth look at the syntax of HTML
-		   and XHTML documents.  This will investigate both the similarities and
-		   differences between the two alternatives and provides guidance on
-		   choosing which to use for your own projects, depending on your needs.
-		   Additionally, this will also provide details about creating polyglot
-		   documents — that is, documents that conform to both
-		   HTML and XHTML simultaneiously — including issues
-		   related to ensuring stylesheets and scripts work correctly under both
-		   conditions.</p>
-		
-		<p>The third and final section provides a reference for the HTML
-		   vocabulary.  Each element is described, providing details about its
-		   its meaning, allowed attributes, content models and DOM APIs.  Each
-		   is accompanied by clear examples illustrating how the element is
-		   designed to be used for a range of different use cases.</p>
+<section>
+	<h2 id=the-html-and-xhtml-syntax><span class=secno>3 </span>The HTML and XHTML Syntax</h2>
+	<p>...</p>
+
+	<section>
+		<h3 id=html><span class=secno>3.1 </span>HTML</h3>
+		...
 	</section>
 </section>
 
+
 <section>
-	<h2 id=how-to-read-this-guide><span class=secno>2 </span>How to Read This Guide</h2>
+	<h2 id=the-html-vocabulary-and-apis><span class=secno>4 </span>The HTML Vocabulary and APIs</h2>
 	<p>...</p>
+</section>
+
+
+<section>
+	<h2 id=how-to-read-this-guide><span class=secno>5 </span>How to Read This Guide</h2>
+	<p class=issue>This section needs major revision and may be dropped.</p>
 
 	<section>
-		<h3 id=conventions><span class=secno>2.1 </span>Conventions</h3>
+		<h3 id=conventions><span class=secno>5.1 </span>Conventions</h3>
 		<p>To ease readability and improve understanding, this document uses a
 		   number of conventions.</p>
 
 		<section>
-			<h4 id=notes,-tips-and-warnings><span class=secno>2.1.1 </span>Notes, Tips and Warnings</h4>
+			<h4 id=notes,-tips-and-warnings><span class=secno>5.1.1 </span>Notes, Tips and Warnings</h4>
 
 			<p>Notes are used throughout this document to provide additional
 			   information. Tips are used to provide useful hints and suggestions.
@@ -198,7 +260,7 @@
 		</section>
 
 		<section>
-			<h4 id=example-markup><span class=secno>2.1.2 </span>Example Markup</h4>
+			<h4 id=example-markup><span class=secno>5.1.2 </span>Example Markup</h4>
 			<p>Example markup is provided for both HTML and XHTML. In some cases, the
 			   markup is the same and thus only one example is needed, but in others
 			   there may be differences syntactic differences. Where HTML and XHTML
@@ -243,7 +305,7 @@
 
 
 			<section>
-				<h5 id=attributes><span class=secno>2.1.2.1 </span>Attributes</h5>
+				<h5 id=attributes><span class=secno>5.1.2.1 </span>Attributes</h5>
 				<p>Unless explicitly stated otherwise for a specific purpose, all attribute
 				   values in examples are quoted using double quotes. In HTML examples,
 				   boolean attributes are written in their minimised form and in XHTML
@@ -263,7 +325,7 @@
 			</section>
 
 			<section>
-				<h5 id=void-elements><span class=secno>2.1.2.2 </span>Void Elements</h5>
+				<h5 id=void-elements><span class=secno>5.1.2.2 </span>Void Elements</h5>
 				<p>In XHTML examples, due to the XML Well-Formedness requirements, void
 				   elements are always marked up using the trailing slash.</p>
 
@@ -283,7 +345,7 @@
 			</section>
 
 			<section>
-				<h5 id=namespaces><span class=secno>2.1.2.3 </span>Namespaces</h5>
+				<h5 id=namespaces><span class=secno>5.1.2.3 </span>Namespaces</h5>
 				<p>Some XHTML examples make use of XML namespaces. In such cases, the
 				   following prefixes are assumed to be defined even if there is no
 				   <code>xmlns</code> attributes in the fragment of code.</p>
@@ -318,90 +380,4 @@
 		</section>
 	</section>
 </section>
-
-<section>
-	<h2 id=preface><span class=secno>3 </span>Preface</h2>
-
-	<p>The most common format for publishing documents on the web and creating
-	   web applications is HTML.  From its beginning as a relatively simple
-	   language primarily designed for describing scientific documents, it has
-	   grown and adapted to a wide variety needs ranging from publishing news
-	   and blogs, to providing the foundation for full blown applications for
-	   email, maps, word processing and spreadsheets.</p>
-
-	<p>As the uses of HTML have grown, the demands placed upon it by authors
-	   have increased and the limitations of HTML become more pronounced.
-	   HTML 5 is attempting to fill these limitations with new features designed
-	   specifically the address the needs of authors.</p>
-
-	<p>However, the way the HTML5 specification is written is very much targeted
-	   towards implementers rather than web designers and developers, making it
-	   more difficult to read and understand. This document is intended to meet
-	   the needs of web developers by focussing on document conformance criteria
-	   and authoring guidelines.</p>
-
-	<p>Authors who are familiar with previous versions of HTML are advised to
-	   familiarise themselves with <a href=http://www.w3.org/TR/html5-diff/>the differences from HTML 4</a> [HTML4DIFF]</p>
-
-	<section>
-		<h3 id=understanding-semantics><span class=secno>3.1 </span>Understanding Semantics</h3>
-
-		<p>In general, the purpose of writing and publishing a document is to convey
-		   information to the readers.  This could be any kind of information, such
-		   as telling a story, reporting news and current affairs or describing
-		   available products and services.  Whatever the information is, it needs
-		   to be conveyed to the reader in a way that can be easily understood.</p>
-
-		<p>A typical document, such as an book, news article, blog entry or letter
-		   is often grouped into different sections containing a variety of
-		   headings, paragraphs, lists, tables, quotes and various other
-		   typographical structures.  All of these structures are important for more
-		   easily conveying information to the reader and thus authors need a way to
-		   clearly identify each of these structures in a way that can then be
-		   easily presented to the user.  This is the purpose of markup.</p>
-
-		<p>Markup is a machine readable language that describes aspects of a
-		   document such as its structure, semantics and/or style. Some markup
-		   languages are designed solely for the purpose of describing the
-		   presentation of the document, such as RTF (Rich Text Format). Others,
-		   such as HTML, are more generic and rather than focussing on describing
-		   the presentation, they are designed to focus on describing the meaning or
-		   purpose of the content and leave the presentation for another layer to
-		   deal with.</p>
-
-		<p>HTML provides a wide variety of semantic elements that can be used to
-		   mark up various common typographical structures.  There are heading
-		   elements for marking up different levels of headings, a paragraph (p)
-		   element for paragraph, various list elements for marking up different
-		   types of lists, and a table elements for marking up tables.</p>
-
-		<p>It's important to distinguish between the structure and semantics of
-		   content, which should be described using HTML, and its presentation. In
-		   one document, a heading may be presented visually in a large bold
-		   typeface with wide margins above and below to separate it from the
-		   surrounding content and make it stand out.  In another document, a
-		   heading may be presented in a light coloured, italic, fancy script
-		   typeface.  But regardless of the presentation, it's still a heading and
-		   the markup can still uses the same basic elements for identifying common
-		   structures.</p>
-	</section>
-</section>
-
-<section>
-	<h2 id=introductory-tutorial><span class=secno>4 </span>Introductory Tutorial</h2>
-	<p>...</p>
-</section>
-
-<section>
-	<h2 id=the-html-and-xhtml-syntax><span class=secno>5 </span>The HTML and XHTML Syntax</h2>
-	<p>...</p>
-</section>
-
-<section>
-	<h2 id=the-html-vocabulary-and-apis><span class=secno>6 </span>The HTML Vocabulary and APIs</h2>
-	<p>...</p>
-</section>
-
-
-
 </body></html>
\ No newline at end of file

Index: Overview.src.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/public/html5/html-author/Overview.src.html,v
retrieving revision 1.22
retrieving revision 1.23
diff -u -d -r1.22 -r1.23
--- Overview.src.html	29 Jan 2009 14:00:19 -0000	1.22
+++ Overview.src.html	29 Jan 2009 14:50:10 -0000	1.23
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
 <html lang="en-AU">
 <head>
 	<meta charset="UTF-8">
-	<title>The Web Developer’s Guide to HTML 5</title>
+	<title>HTML 5 Reference</title>
 	<style type="text/css">
 	.element { margin: 1em 0 ; padding: 0 0 0.25em; }
 
@@ -33,7 +33,8 @@
 <div class="head">
 	<header>
 		<!--logo-->
-		<h1>The Web Developer’s Guide to HTML 5</h1>
+		<h1>HTML 5 Reference</h1>
+		<h2 class="no-num no-toc">A Web Developer’s Guide to HTML 5</h2>
 		<h2 class="no-num no-toc">W3C Editor’s Draft [DATE: 6 May 2008]</h2>
 
 		<dl>
@@ -71,8 +72,7 @@
 	<p>This document is an Editors Draft of “The Web Developer’s Guide to HTML 5”
 	   produced by the <a href="http://www.w3.org/html/wg/">HTML Working Group</a>,
 	   part of the <a href="http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/Activity">HTML Activity</a>.
-	   The working group is working on a new version of HTML not yet published
-	   under TR. In the meantime, you can access the
+	   The working group is working on HTML 5. In the meantime, you can access the
 	   <a href="http://www.w3.org/html/wg/html5/">HTML&nbsp;5 Editor's draft</a>.
 	   The appropriate forum for comments on this document is
 	   <a href="mailto:public-html-comments@w3.org">public-html-comments@w3.org</a>
@@ -104,60 +104,125 @@
 <section>
 	<h1>Introduction</h1>
 	
-	<section>
-		<h1>Scope</h1>
-		<p>This document is intended to provide a reference guide explaining the
-		   conforming HTML vocabulary and its associated scripting APIs.
-		   Guidance will be provided in regard to the correct and incorrect
-		   usage of semantic elements. Both HTML and XHTML will be explained in
-		   depth, including illustrating their differences and similarities,
-		   both syntactically and the effect of each upon the DOM APIs.</p>
-	</section>
+	<p>This document serves as a reference guide for the HTML syntax,
+	   vocabulary and its associated DOM APIs and is intended for web site
+	   and application developers, publishers, tutorial writers and teachers
+	   and their students. That is, people who write documents using HTML,
+	   or who teach others to do so. This guide is structured into three
+	   major sections.</p>
+
+	<p>The first provides an introductory tutorial on writing HTML,
+	   explaining the basic structure and syntax of an HTML document,
+	   covering the fundamental techniques and best practices, encouraging
+	   the use of clean and valid markup, and the use of quality assurance
+	   tools.</p>
+
+	<p>The second section provides an in depth look at the syntax of HTML
+	   and XHTML documents.  This will investigate both the similarities and
+	   differences between the two alternatives and provides guidance on
+	   choosing which to use for your own projects, depending on your needs.
+	   Additionally, this will also provide details about creating polyglot
+	   documents&#x200A;—&#x200A;that is, documents that conform to both
+	   HTML and XHTML simultaneiously&#x200A;—&#x200A;including issues
+	   related to ensuring stylesheets and scripts work correctly under both
+	   conditions.</p>
 	
+	<p>The third and final section provides a reference for the HTML
+	   vocabulary.  Each element is described, providing details about its
+	   its meaning, allowed attributes, content models and DOM APIs.  Each
+	   is accompanied by clear examples illustrating how the element is
+	   designed to be used for a range of different use cases.</p>
+</section>
+
+<section>
+	<h1>Introductory Tutorial</h1>
+
+	<p>The most common format for publishing documents on the web and creating
+	   web applications is HTML.  From its beginning as a relatively simple
+	   language primarily designed for describing scientific documents, it has
+	   grown and adapted to a wide variety needs ranging from publishing news
+	   and blogs, to providing the foundation for full blown applications for
+	   email, maps, word processing and spreadsheets.</p>
+
+	<p>As the uses of HTML have grown, the demands placed upon it by authors
+	   have increased and the limitations of HTML become more pronounced.
+	   HTML 5 is attempting to fill these limitations with new features designed
+	   specifically the address the needs of authors.</p>
+
+	<p>However, the way the HTML5 specification is written is very much targeted
+	   towards implementers rather than web designers and developers, making it
+	   more difficult to read and understand. This document is intended to meet
+	   the needs of web developers by focussing on document conformance criteria
+	   and authoring guidelines.</p>
+
+	<p>Authors who are familiar with previous versions of HTML are advised to
+	   familiarise themselves with <a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/html5-diff/">the differences from HTML 4</a> [HTML4DIFF]</p>
+
 	<section>
-		<h1>Intended Audience</h1>
-		<p>This document is primarily intended for web site and application
-		   developers, publishers, tutorial writers and teachers and their
-		   students. That is, people who write documents using HTML, or who
-		   teach others to do so. Additionally, authoring and quality assurance
-		   tool developers may find its content useful for incorporating into
-		   their products in the form of help, references and examples intended
-		   to assist users with understanding and using the language.</p>
+		<h1>Understanding Semantics</h1>
+
+		<p>In general, the purpose of writing and publishing a document is to convey
+		   information to the readers.  This could be any kind of information, such
+		   as telling a story, reporting news and current affairs or describing
+		   available products and services.  Whatever the information is, it needs
+		   to be conveyed to the reader in a way that can be easily understood.</p>
+
+		<p>A typical document, such as an book, news article, blog entry or letter
+		   is often grouped into different sections containing a variety of
+		   headings, paragraphs, lists, tables, quotes and various other
+		   typographical structures.  All of these structures are important for more
+		   easily conveying information to the reader and thus authors need a way to
+		   clearly identify each of these structures in a way that can then be
+		   easily presented to the user.  This is the purpose of markup.</p>
+
+		<p>Markup is a machine readable language that describes aspects of a
+		   document such as its structure, semantics and/or style. Some markup
+		   languages are designed solely for the purpose of describing the
+		   presentation of the document, such as RTF (Rich Text Format). Others,
+		   such as HTML, are more generic and rather than focussing on describing
+		   the presentation, they are designed to focus on describing the meaning or
+		   purpose of the content and leave the presentation for another layer to
+		   deal with.</p>
+
+		<p>HTML provides a wide variety of semantic elements that can be used to
+		   mark up various common typographical structures.  There are heading
+		   elements for marking up different levels of headings, a paragraph (p)
+		   element for paragraph, various list elements for marking up different
+		   types of lists, and a table elements for marking up tables.</p>
+
+		<p>It's important to distinguish between the structure and semantics of
+		   content, which should be described using HTML, and its presentation. In
+		   one document, a heading may be presented visually in a large bold
+		   typeface with wide margins above and below to separate it from the
+		   surrounding content and make it stand out.  In another document, a
+		   heading may be presented in a light coloured, italic, fancy script
+		   typeface.  But regardless of the presentation, it's still a heading and
+		   the markup can still uses the same basic elements for identifying common
+		   structures.</p>
 	</section>
-	
-	<section>
-		<h1>Overview</h1>
-		<p>This document serves as a reference guide for the HTML syntax,
-		   vocabulary and its associated DOM APIs. This guide is structured into
-		   three major sections.</p>
+</section>
 
-		<p>The first provides an introductory tutorial on writing HTML,
-		   explaining the basic structure and syntax of an HTML document,
-		   covering the fundamental techniques and best practices, encouraging
-		   the use of clean and valid markup, and the use of quality assurance
-		   tools.</p>
 
-		<p>The second section provides an in depth look at the syntax of HTML
-		   and XHTML documents.  This will investigate both the similarities and
-		   differences between the two alternatives and provides guidance on
-		   choosing which to use for your own projects, depending on your needs.
-		   Additionally, this will also provide details about creating polyglot
-		   documents&#x200A;—&#x200A;that is, documents that conform to both
-		   HTML and XHTML simultaneiously&#x200A;—&#x200A;including issues
-		   related to ensuring stylesheets and scripts work correctly under both
-		   conditions.</p>
-		
-		<p>The third and final section provides a reference for the HTML
-		   vocabulary.  Each element is described, providing details about its
-		   its meaning, allowed attributes, content models and DOM APIs.  Each
-		   is accompanied by clear examples illustrating how the element is
-		   designed to be used for a range of different use cases.</p>
+<section>
+	<h1>The HTML and XHTML Syntax</h1>
+	<p>...</p>
+
+	<section>
+		<h1>HTML</h1>
+		...
 	</section>
 </section>
 
+
 <section>
-	<h1>How to Read This Guide</h1>
+	<h1>The HTML Vocabulary and APIs</h1>
 	<p>...</p>
+</section>
+
+
+<section>
+	<h1>How to Read This Guide</h1>
+	<p class=issue>This section needs major revision and may be dropped.</p>
 
 	<section>
 		<h1>Conventions</h1>
@@ -305,87 +370,3 @@
 		</section>
 	</section>
 </section>
-
-<section>
-	<h1>Introductory Tutorial</h1>
-
-	<p>The most common format for publishing documents on the web and creating
-	   web applications is HTML.  From its beginning as a relatively simple
-	   language primarily designed for describing scientific documents, it has
-	   grown and adapted to a wide variety needs ranging from publishing news
-	   and blogs, to providing the foundation for full blown applications for
-	   email, maps, word processing and spreadsheets.</p>
-
-	<p>As the uses of HTML have grown, the demands placed upon it by authors
-	   have increased and the limitations of HTML become more pronounced.
-	   HTML 5 is attempting to fill these limitations with new features designed
-	   specifically the address the needs of authors.</p>
-
-	<p>However, the way the HTML5 specification is written is very much targeted
-	   towards implementers rather than web designers and developers, making it
-	   more difficult to read and understand. This document is intended to meet
-	   the needs of web developers by focussing on document conformance criteria
-	   and authoring guidelines.</p>
-
-	<p>Authors who are familiar with previous versions of HTML are advised to
-	   familiarise themselves with <a href="http://www.w3.org/TR/html5-diff/">the differences from HTML 4</a> [HTML4DIFF]</p>
-
-	<section>
-		<h1>Understanding Semantics</h1>
-
-		<p>In general, the purpose of writing and publishing a document is to convey
-		   information to the readers.  This could be any kind of information, such
-		   as telling a story, reporting news and current affairs or describing
-		   available products and services.  Whatever the information is, it needs
-		   to be conveyed to the reader in a way that can be easily understood.</p>
-
-		<p>A typical document, such as an book, news article, blog entry or letter
-		   is often grouped into different sections containing a variety of
-		   headings, paragraphs, lists, tables, quotes and various other
-		   typographical structures.  All of these structures are important for more
-		   easily conveying information to the reader and thus authors need a way to
-		   clearly identify each of these structures in a way that can then be
-		   easily presented to the user.  This is the purpose of markup.</p>
-
-		<p>Markup is a machine readable language that describes aspects of a
-		   document such as its structure, semantics and/or style. Some markup
-		   languages are designed solely for the purpose of describing the
-		   presentation of the document, such as RTF (Rich Text Format). Others,
-		   such as HTML, are more generic and rather than focussing on describing
-		   the presentation, they are designed to focus on describing the meaning or
-		   purpose of the content and leave the presentation for another layer to
-		   deal with.</p>
-
-		<p>HTML provides a wide variety of semantic elements that can be used to
-		   mark up various common typographical structures.  There are heading
-		   elements for marking up different levels of headings, a paragraph (p)
-		   element for paragraph, various list elements for marking up different
-		   types of lists, and a table elements for marking up tables.</p>
-
-		<p>It's important to distinguish between the structure and semantics of
-		   content, which should be described using HTML, and its presentation. In
-		   one document, a heading may be presented visually in a large bold
-		   typeface with wide margins above and below to separate it from the
-		   surrounding content and make it stand out.  In another document, a
-		   heading may be presented in a light coloured, italic, fancy script
-		   typeface.  But regardless of the presentation, it's still a heading and
-		   the markup can still uses the same basic elements for identifying common
-		   structures.</p>
-	</section>
-
-<section>
-	<h1>The HTML and XHTML Syntax</h1>
-	<p>...</p>
-	
-	<section>
-		<h1>HTML</h1>
-	</section>
-</section>
-
-<section>
-	<h1>The HTML Vocabulary and APIs</h1>
-	<p>...</p>
-</section>
-
-</body>
-</html>
Received on Thursday, 29 January 2009 14:50:21 GMT

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