W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-html-commits@w3.org > July 2008

html5/html-author charref.html,NONE,1.1 Overview.html,1.12,1.13 Overview.src.html,1.12,1.13

From: Lachlan Hunt via cvs-syncmail <cvsmail@w3.org>
Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2008 18:21:36 +0000
To: public-html-commits@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1KKH3o-0008Q4-LR@lionel-hutz.w3.org>

Update of /sources/public/html5/html-author
In directory hutz:/tmp/cvs-serv32281

Modified Files:
	Overview.html Overview.src.html 
Added Files:
	charref.html 
Log Message:
Added initial character references table draft

Index: Overview.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/public/html5/html-author/Overview.html,v
retrieving revision 1.12
retrieving revision 1.13
diff -u -d -r1.12 -r1.13
--- Overview.html	12 Jun 2008 16:30:39 -0000	1.12
+++ Overview.html	19 Jul 2008 18:21:34 -0000	1.13
@@ -39,13 +39,13 @@
 
    <h1 id=the-web>The Web Developer’s Guide to HTML 5</h1>
 
-   <h2 class="no-num no-toc" id=w3c-editors>W3C Editor’s Draft 12 June 2008</h2>
+   <h2 class="no-num no-toc" id=w3c-editors>W3C Editor’s Draft 19 July 2008</h2>
 
    <dl>
     <dt>This version:
 
     <dd><a
-     href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2008/ED-html5-author-20080612">http://www.w3.org/TR/2008/ED-html5-author-20080612</a>
+     href="http://www.w3.org/TR/2008/ED-html5-author-20080719">http://www.w3.org/TR/2008/ED-html5-author-20080719</a>
 
     <dt>Latest version:
 
@@ -163,8 +163,17 @@
 
      <li><a href="#attributes0"><span class=secno>3.3 </span>Attributes</a>
       <ul class=toc>
-       <li><a href="#empty"><span class=secno>3.3.1 </span>Empty
+       <li><a href="#empty-attr"><span class=secno>3.3.1 </span>Empty
         Attributes</a>
+
+       <li><a href="#unquoted-attr"><span class=secno>3.3.2 </span>Unquoted
+        Attribute Values</a>
+
+       <li><a href="#single-quote-attr"><span class=secno>3.3.3
+        </span>Single-Quoted Attribute Values</a>
+
+       <li><a href="#double-quote-attr"><span class=secno>3.3.4
+        </span>Double-Quoted Attribute Values</a>
       </ul>
     </ul>
 
@@ -464,6 +473,14 @@
 &lt;/html&gt;</pre>
   </div>
 
+  <p class=note>Note: The XHTML document does not need to include the DOCTYPE
+   because XHTML documents that are delivered correctly using an XML MIME
+   type and are processed as XML by browsers, are always rendered in <em>no
+   quirks mode</em>. However, the DOCTYPE may optionally be included, and
+   should be included if the document uses the compatible subset of markup
+   that is conforming in both HTML and XHTML, and is ever expected to be used
+   in <code>text/html</code> environments.
+
   <p>Both the HTML and XHTML syntax appear similar and it is possible to mark
    up documents using a common subset of of the syntax that is the same in
    both, while avoiding the syntactic sugar that is unique to each.
@@ -499,25 +516,26 @@
 
   <pre><code>&lt;!DOCTYPE html&gt;</code></pre>
 
-  <p>The DOCTYPE originates from HTML's SGML lineage and, in previous levels
-   of HTML, was originally used to refer to a Document Type Definition — a
-   formal declaration of the elements, attributes and syntactic features that
-   could be used within the document. Those who are familiar with previous
-   levels of HTML will notice that there is no PUBLIC or SYSTEM identifier
-   present in this DOCTYPE, which were used to refer to the DTD.
+  <p>The <code>DOCTYPE</code> originates from HTML’s SGML lineage and, in
+   previous levels of HTML, was originally used to refer to a Document Type
+   Definition (DTD) — a formal declaration of the elements, attributes and
+   syntactic features that could be used within the document. Those who are
+   familiar with previous levels of HTML will notice that there is no
+   <code>PUBLIC</code> or <code>SYSTEM</code> identifier present in this
+   <code>DOCTYPE</code>, which were used to refer to the DTD.
 
-  <p>As HTML5 is no longer formally based upon SGML, the DOCTYPE no longer
-   serves this purpose, and thus it does not refer to a DTD anymore. However,
-   due to legacy constraints, it has gained another very important purpose:
-   triggering no-quirks mode in browsers.
+  <p>As HTML5 is no longer formally based upon SGML, the <code>DOCTYPE</code>
+   no longer serves this purpose, and thus it does not refer to a DTD
+   anymore. However, due to legacy constraints, it has gained another very
+   important purpose: triggering no-quirks mode in browsers.
 
   <p>HTML 5 defines three modes: <strong>quirks mode</strong>,
    <strong>limited quirks mode</strong> and <strong>no quirks mode</strong>,
-   of which it is only considered conforming to use the latter. The reason
-   for this is due to backwards compatibility. The important thing to
-   understand is that there are differences in the way documents are visually
-   rendered in each of the modes and to ensure the most standards compliant
-   rendering, it is important to ensure no-quirks mode is used.
+   of which only the latter is considered conforming to use. The reason for
+   this is due to backwards compatibility. The important thing to understand
+   is that there are differences in the way documents are visually rendered
+   in each of the modes and to ensure the most standards compliant rendering,
+   it is important to ensure no-quirks mode is used.
 
   <h3 id=elements><span class=secno>3.2 </span>Elements</h3>
 
@@ -552,9 +570,7 @@
   </div>
 
   <p>An empty element is any element that does not contain any content within
-   it. Some elements are forbidden from containing any content at all, and
-   this special class of empty elements are known as <em>void elements</em>.
-   In general, an empty element is just one with a start tag immediately
+   it. In general, an empty element is just one with a start tag immediately
    followed by its associated end tag. In both HTML and XHTML syntaxes, this
    can be represented in the same way.
 
@@ -564,10 +580,12 @@
    <pre><code>&lt;span&gt;&lt;/span&gt;</code></pre>
   </div>
 
-  <p>But note that in HTML, that syntax cannot be used for void elements. For
-   such elements, the end tag must be omitted because the element is
-   automatically closed by the parser. Such elements include, among others,
-   <code>br</code>, <code>hr</code>, <code>link</code> and <code>meta</code>
+  <p>Some elements, however, are forbidden from containing any content at
+   all. These are known as <em>void elements</em>. In HTML, the above syntax
+   cannot be used for void elements. For such elements, the end tag must be
+   omitted because the element is automatically closed by the parser. Such
+   elements include, among others, <code>br</code>, <code>hr</code>,
+   <code>link</code> and <code>meta</code>
 
   <div class="example html">
    <p>HTML Example:</p>
@@ -577,8 +595,8 @@
 
   <p>In XHTML, the XML syntactic requirements dictate that this must be made
    explicit using either an explicit end tag, as above, or the empty element
-   tag syntax. This is achieved by inserting a slash at the end of the start
-   tag, immediately before the right angle bracket.
+   syntax. This is achieved by inserting a slash at the end of the start tag
+   immediately before the right angle bracket.
 
   <div class=example>
    <p>Example:</p>
@@ -620,14 +638,12 @@
   <p>There are four slightly different syntaxes that may be used for
    attributes in HTML: Empty attribute syntax, Unquoted attribute value
    syntax, Single-quoted attribute value syntax and Double-quoted attribute
-   value syntax.
-
-  <p>All four syntaxes may be used in the HTML syntax, depending on what is
-   needed for each specific attribute. However, in the XHTML syntax,
-   attribute values must always be quoted using either single or double
-   quotes.
+   value syntax. All four syntaxes may be used in the HTML syntax, depending
+   on what is needed for each specific attribute. However, in the XHTML
+   syntax, attribute values must always be quoted using either single or
+   double quotes.
 
-  <h4 id=empty><span class=secno>3.3.1 </span>Empty Attributes</h4>
+  <h4 id=empty-attr><span class=secno>3.3.1 </span>Empty Attributes</h4>
 
   <p>An empty attribute is one where the value has been omitted. This is a
    syntactic shorthand for specifying the attribute with an empty value, and
@@ -644,9 +660,9 @@
    <pre><code>&lt;input disabled=""&gt;...&lt;/div&gt;</code></pre>
   </div>
 
-  <p class=note>Note: While, in the previous, it is semantically equivalent
-   to specifying the attribute with the value <code>"disabled"</code>, it is
-   not exactly the same.
+  <p class=note>Note: While, in the previous example, it is semantically
+   equivalent to specifying the attribute with the value
+   <code>"disabled"</code>, it is not exactly the same.
 
   <div class="html example">
    <p>Example:</p>
@@ -659,14 +675,29 @@
    <pre><code>&lt;img src="decoration.png" alt=""&gt;</code></pre>
   </div>
 
+  <h4 id=unquoted-attr><span class=secno>3.3.2 </span>Unquoted Attribute
+   Values</h4>
+
+  <p>In HTML, but not in XHTML, the quotes surrounding the value may also be
+   omitted in most cases. This does not apply to XHTML. The value may contain
+   any characters except for spaces, single or double quotes (<code>'</code>
+   or <code>"</code>), an equals sign (<code>=</code>) or a greater-than
+   symbol (<code>&gt;</code>). If you need an attribute to contain those
+   characters, they either need to be escaped using character references, or
+   you need to use either the <span title=single-quote-attr>single-</span> or
+   <span title=double-quote-attr>double-quoted attribute values</span>.
+
+  <h4 id=single-quote-attr><span class=secno>3.3.3 </span>Single-Quoted
+   Attribute Values</h4>
+
   <div class=example>
    <p>Example:</p>
 
    <pre><code>&lt;div class='example'&gt;...&lt;/div&gt;</code></pre>
   </div>
 
-  <p>In HTML, the quotes surround the value may also be omitted in most
-   cases.
+  <h4 id=double-quote-attr><span class=secno>3.3.4 </span>Double-Quoted
+   Attribute Values</h4>
 
   <p>In XHTML, attribute names are case sensitive and most are defined to be
    lowercase. In HTML, attribute names are case insensitive, and so they

--- NEW FILE: charref.html ---
<!DOCTYPE html>
<meta charset="UTF-8">
<title>Character Entity Reference Chart</title>
<style>
table { font: .8em Monaco; display: block; }
tr { background: #EEE; display: inline-block; text-align: center; width: 10em; height: 10em; margin: .5em; padding: 1px; position: relative; }
td { display: block; }

.character { font: 4em Georgia, serif; line-height: 1.1; }

.hex, .dec { visibility: hidden; }
.desc { display: none; position :absolute; text-align: center; background: silver; color: black; }

tr:hover .character { font-size: 2em; }
tr:hover .hex, tr:hover .dec { visibility: visible; }
xtr:hover .desc { display: block; top: 100%; left: 0; }
</style>
<table>
	<tr title="U+00009 CHARACTER TABULATION" class="8879-isogrk4"><td class="character">&#x00009;</td><td class="named"><code>&amp;Tab;</code></td><td class="hex"><code>&amp;#x00009;</code></td><td class="dec"><code>&amp;#9;</code></td><td class="desc">CHARACTER TABULATION</td></tr>
[...1463 lines suppressed...]
		<td class="character">&#x00027;</td>
		<td class="named"><code>&amp;apos;</code></td>
		<td class="hex"><code>&amp;#x00027;</code></td>
		<td class="dec"><code>&amp;#39;</code></td>
		<td class="desc">APOSTROPHE</td>
	</tr>
	<tr><td class="character">&#x0003C;</td>
		<td class="named"><code>&amp;lt; &amp;LT;</code></td>
		<td class="hex"><code>&amp;#x0003C;</code></td>
		<td class="dec"><code>&amp;#60;</code></td>
		<td class="desc">LESS-THAN SIGN</td>
	</tr>
	<tr><td class="character">&#x0003E;</td>
		<td class="named"><code>&amp;gt; &amp;GT;</code></td>
		<td class="hex"><code>&amp;#x0003E;</code></td>
		<td class="dec"><code>&amp;#62;</code></td>
		<td class="desc">GREATER-THAN SIGN</td>
	</tr>
</table>
-->
Index: Overview.src.html
===================================================================
RCS file: /sources/public/html5/html-author/Overview.src.html,v
retrieving revision 1.12
retrieving revision 1.13
diff -u -d -r1.12 -r1.13
--- Overview.src.html	12 Jun 2008 16:30:39 -0000	1.12
+++ Overview.src.html	19 Jul 2008 18:21:34 -0000	1.13
@@ -301,6 +301,14 @@
 &lt;/html&gt;</pre>
 	</div>
 
+	<p class="note">Note: The XHTML document does not need to include the
+	   DOCTYPE because XHTML documents that are delivered correctly using an
+	   XML MIME type and are processed as XML by browsers, are always rendered
+	   in <em>no quirks mode</em>. However, the DOCTYPE may optionally be
+	   included, and should be included if the document uses the compatible
+	   subset of markup that is conforming in both HTML and XHTML, and is ever
+	   expected to be used in <code>text/html</code> environments.</p>
+
 	<p>Both the HTML and XHTML syntax appear similar and it is possible to mark
 	   up documents using a common subset of of the syntax that is the same in
 	   both, while avoiding the syntactic sugar that is unique to each.
@@ -334,25 +342,26 @@
 
 	<pre><code>&lt;!DOCTYPE html&gt;</code></pre>
 
-	<p>The DOCTYPE originates from HTML's SGML lineage and, in previous levels
-	   of HTML, was originally used to refer to a Document Type Definition —
-	   a formal declaration of the elements, attributes and syntactic features
-	   that could be used within the document. Those who are familiar with
-	   previous levels of HTML will notice that there is no PUBLIC or SYSTEM
-	   identifier present in this DOCTYPE, which were used to refer to the DTD.</p>
+	<p>The <code>DOCTYPE</code> originates from HTML’s SGML lineage and, in
+	   previous levels of HTML, was originally used to refer to a Document Type
+	   Definition (DTD) — a formal declaration of the elements, attributes and
+	   syntactic features that could be used within the document. Those who are
+	   familiar with previous levels of HTML will notice that there is no
+	   <code>PUBLIC</code> or <code>SYSTEM</code> identifier present in this
+	   <code>DOCTYPE</code>, which were used to refer to the DTD.</p>
 
-	<p>As HTML5 is no longer formally based upon SGML, the DOCTYPE no longer
-	   serves this purpose, and thus it does not refer to a DTD anymore.
-	   However, due to legacy constraints, it has gained another very important
-	   purpose: triggering no-quirks mode in browsers.</p>
+	<p>As HTML5 is no longer formally based upon SGML, the <code>DOCTYPE</code>
+	   no longer serves this purpose, and thus it does not refer to a DTD
+	   anymore. However, due to legacy constraints, it has gained another very
+	   important purpose: triggering no-quirks mode in browsers.</p>
 
 	<p>HTML 5 defines three modes: <strong>quirks mode</strong>,
 	   <strong>limited quirks mode</strong> and <strong>no quirks mode</strong>,
-	   of which it is only considered conforming to use the latter. The reason
-	   for this is due to backwards compatibility. The important thing to
-	   understand is that there are differences in the way documents are
-	   visually rendered in each of the modes and to ensure the most standards
-	   compliant rendering, it is important to ensure no-quirks mode is used.</p>
+	   of which only the latter is considered conforming to use. The reason for
+	   this is due to backwards compatibility. The important thing to understand
+	   is that there are differences in the way documents are visually rendered
+	   in each of the modes and to ensure the most standards compliant
+	   rendering, it is important to ensure no-quirks mode is used.</p>
 
 
 	<h3>Elements</h3>
@@ -385,9 +394,7 @@
 	</div>
 
 	<p>An empty element is any element that does not contain any content within
-	   it. Some elements are forbidden from containing any content at all, and
-	   this special class of empty elements are known as <em>void elements</em>.
-	   In general, an empty element is just one with a start tag immediately
+	   it. In general, an empty element is just one with a start tag immediately
 	   followed by its associated end tag. In both HTML and XHTML syntaxes, this
 	   can be represented in the same way.</p>
 
@@ -396,10 +403,12 @@
 		<pre><code>&lt;span&gt;&lt;/span&gt;</code></pre>
 	</div>
 
-	<p>But note that in HTML, that syntax cannot be used for void elements. For
-	   such elements, the end tag must be omitted because the element is
-	   automatically closed by the parser. Such elements include, among others,
-	   <code>br</code>, <code>hr</code>, <code>link</code> and <code>meta</code></p>
+	<p>Some elements, however, are forbidden from containing any content at all.
+	   These are known as <em>void elements</em>. In HTML, the above syntax
+	   cannot be used for void elements. For such elements, the end tag must be
+	   omitted because the element is automatically closed by the parser. Such
+	   elements include, among others, <code>br</code>, <code>hr</code>,
+	   <code>link</code> and <code>meta</code></p>
 
 	<div class="example html">
 		<p>HTML Example:</p>
@@ -408,8 +417,8 @@
 
 	<p>In XHTML, the XML syntactic requirements dictate that this must be made
 	   explicit using either an explicit end tag, as above, or the empty element
-	   tag syntax. This is achieved by inserting a slash at the end of the start
-	   tag, immediately before the right angle bracket.</p>
+	   syntax. This is achieved by inserting a slash at the end of the start tag
+	   immediately before the right angle bracket.</p>
 
 	<div class="example">
 		<p>Example:</p>
@@ -448,14 +457,12 @@
 	<p>There are four slightly different syntaxes that may be used for
 	   attributes in HTML: Empty attribute syntax, Unquoted attribute value
 	   syntax, Single-quoted attribute value syntax and Double-quoted attribute
-	   value syntax.</p>
-
-	<p>All four syntaxes may be used in the HTML syntax, depending on what is
-	   needed for each specific attribute.  However, in the XHTML syntax,
-	   attribute values must always be quoted using either single or double
-	   quotes.</p>
+	   value syntax. All four syntaxes may be used in the HTML syntax, depending
+	   on what is needed for each specific attribute.  However, in the XHTML
+	   syntax, attribute values must always be quoted using either single or
+	   double quotes.</p>
 
-	<h4>Empty Attributes</h4>
+	<h4 id="empty-attr">Empty Attributes</h4>
 
 	<p>An empty attribute is one where the value has been omitted. This is a
 	   syntactic shorthand for specifying the attribute with an empty value,
@@ -470,9 +477,9 @@
 		<pre><code>&lt;input disabled=""&gt;...&lt;/div&gt;</code></pre>		
 	</div>
 
-	<p class="note">Note: While, in the previous, it is semantically equivalent
-	   to specifying the attribute with the value <code>"disabled"</code>, it is
-	   not exactly the same.</p>
+	<p class="note">Note: While, in the previous example, it is semantically
+	   equivalent to specifying the attribute with the value <code>"disabled"</code>,
+	   it is not exactly the same.</p>
 
 	<div class="html example">
 		<p>Example:</p>
@@ -483,13 +490,27 @@
 		<pre><code>&lt;img src="decoration.png" alt=""&gt;</code></pre>
 	</div>
 
+	<h4 id="unquoted-attr">Unquoted Attribute Values</h4>
+ 
+	<p>In HTML, but not in XHTML, the quotes surrounding the value may also be
+	   omitted in most cases. This does not apply to XHTML. The value may
+	   contain any characters except for spaces, single or double quotes
+	   (<code>'</code> or <code>"</code>), an equals sign (<code>=</code>) or a
+	   greater-than symbol (<code>&gt;</code>). If you need an attribute to
+	   contain those characters, they either need to be escaped using
+	   character references, or you need to use either the
+	   <span title="single-quote-attr">single-</span> or
+	   <span title="double-quote-attr">double-quoted attribute values</span>.</p>
+
+	<h4 id="single-quote-attr">Single-Quoted Attribute Values</h4>
+
 	<div class="example">
 		<p>Example:</p>
 		<pre><code>&lt;div class='example'&gt;...&lt;/div&gt;</code></pre>
 	</div>
 
-	<p>In HTML, the quotes surround the value may also be omitted in most cases.
-	   </p>
+	<h4 id="double-quote-attr">Double-Quoted Attribute Values</h4>
+
 
 	<p>In XHTML, attribute names are case sensitive and most are defined to be
 	   lowercase. In HTML, attribute names are case insensitive, and so they
Received on Saturday, 19 July 2008 18:22:10 GMT

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