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[Bug 12062] UTF-8 BOM should not be forbidden in Polyglot Markup

From: <bugzilla@jessica.w3.org>
Date: Thu, 03 Mar 2011 23:26:08 +0000
To: public-html-bugzilla@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1PvHuK-0001gP-BW@jessica.w3.org>
http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=12062

--- Comment #7 from Leif Halvard Silli <xn--mlform-iua@xn--mlform-iua.no> 2011-03-03 23:26:07 UTC ---
(In reply to comment #6)
> (In reply to comment #5)

> ISSUE II

> However, it is, perhaps, not for us to _speculate_ about why it is not permitted? 

The above sentence refers to what HTML5 says. HTML5 says that <meta
charset="UTF-8"/> is permitted inside XHTML5. THat is: HTML5 permits that a
HTML5 element, is used inside XHTML5 - despite that it is is useless in XHTML5.

Strictly speaking, HTML5 could have permitted other variants of the <meta
charset="*"/> element ( as well as variants of the <meta
http-equiv="content-type" content="*"/>) - too - it would ease transition
between XML and HTML, when non-UTF-8 is used. 

But HTML5 doesn't do that.  And perhaps we don't need to speculate about why.
There is a justification inside HTML5: moving documents to and from HTML and
XML.

Strictly _strictly_ speaking, I think that when HTML5 _permits_ <meta
charset="UTF-8" /> inside XHTML, then it does - in reality - actually _forbid_
other values than "UTF-8" inside the XHTML encoding. (Though - it depens on how
one looks at it  - of course.)

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Received on Thursday, 3 March 2011 23:26:10 GMT

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