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[Bug 10814] i18n comment 9 : block-display elements should act as UBA paragraph breaks

From: <bugzilla@jessica.w3.org>
Date: Wed, 13 Oct 2010 19:50:22 +0000
To: public-html-bugzilla@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1P67LC-0002cc-Ul@jessica.w3.org>
http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=10814

--- Comment #8 from Aharon Lanin <aharon.lists.lanin@gmail.com> 2010-10-13 19:50:22 UTC ---
(In reply to comment #7)
> (In reply to comment #5)
> > If we're not talking about CSS, what is a "block element" or an "inline
> > element"?
> 
> Block elements are those that are displayed as blocks without a stylesheet or
> with the default stylesheet (and also with most other stylesheets) by browsers.
> 
> Inline elements are those that are displayed inline without a stylesheet or
> with the default stylesheet (and also with most other stylesheets) by browsers.
> 
> (this distinction is rather irrelevant for this bug, because the text says
> "regardless of whether it is a block element or inline element", but the
> information given here may be helpful in other contexts)
> 
> As for background information, a quick Google search found e.g.:
> http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/struct/global.html#h-7.5.3
> http://htmlhelp.com/reference/html40/block.html
> http://htmlhelp.com/reference/html40/inline.html

Those are all references to HTML 4.0. HTML 5 seems to be doing away with the
concept of block and inline elements. It has a complicated graph of
intersecting element types:
<http://dev.w3.org/html5/spec/Overview.html#kinds-of-content>.

It is possible to replace "block elements" with something like "flow elements
that are not phrasing or sectioning elements", but the question remains whether
there is a need to define the behavior of these elements in the absence of CSS
given Ian's comment on another bug:

'HTML explicitly doesn't define rendering except by reference to CSS,
which applies whether or not the browser actually implements CSS  the spec
says "User agents that use other presentation mechanisms can derive their
expected behavior by translating from the CSS rules", where "expected to" is
the normative equivalent of "must" in that section.'

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Received on Wednesday, 13 October 2010 19:50:26 UTC

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