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Re: why are we pursuing this idea? (was: Implementation Details request on Issue 204 Decision)

From: Benjamin Hawkes-Lewis <bhawkeslewis@googlemail.com>
Date: Tue, 21 Aug 2012 15:19:46 +0100
Message-ID: <CAEhSh3dvJP+zyjPLU-jRGwp6eDr8x+GJUaV1-8dC5JcopU7Jmg@mail.gmail.com>
To: Steve Faulkner <faulkner.steve@gmail.com>
Cc: John Foliot <john@foliot.ca>, Maciej Stachowiak <mjs@apple.com>, HTML Accessibility Task Force <public-html-a11y@w3.org>, public-html@w3.org, Chaals McCathieNevile <w3b@chaals.com>
On Aug 21, 2012 2:49 PM, "Steve Faulkner" <faulkner.steve@gmail.com> wrote:
> > * A driving course, where an image shows some situation and the learner
is asked to determine what they are allowed or not allowed to do. (Yes this
is a trick question. I know plenty of blind people who learned the road
rules, and I see no reason why they shouldn't be able to help their kids
learn to pass the theory exam that so many countries impose). The driving
school refuses to add text to their layout, which is a more-or-less exact
copy of the layout used in the official exam.

[snip]

> I presume they refuse because of design constraints right? but they
> are willing to provide the text. If so I would recommend adding a link
> to the text that appears on focus and hover on the some appropriate
> part of the content.Something it adds minimum screen noise but makes
> the content available to anyone that may benefit from it.

Discoverability for speech recognition users would be poor?

I suspect there is always a susability cost when you don't have a default
visual indicator.

An advantage of defining an association between media and a long text
alternative using markup semantics is that client software at least has the
option of providing such an indicator.
Received on Tuesday, 21 August 2012 14:20:16 GMT

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