W3C home > Mailing lists > Public > public-html-a11y@w3.org > September 2011

[Bug 14150] I am a photographer as well as a hand-coding web designer. One thing that frustrates me is the duplicity between alt="" and title="" for photographs and photographers. For instance: <img class="thumbnail" alt="David Kyles" title="David Kyles Shock and Awe

From: <bugzilla@jessica.w3.org>
Date: Sat, 24 Sep 2011 19:36:02 +0000
To: public-html-a11y@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1R7Y14-0007nD-SZ@jessica.w3.org>
http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=14150

--- Comment #5 from html5bugs@gmail.com 2011-09-24 19:36:01 UTC ---
This is what the current "best practices" are, which shows in the "real world"
what people are doing in order to deal with the problem of alt hiding
information and being "all but mandatory" while the title attribute does not
hide information, but is meaningless to data gathering tools.

This workaround is easy to do when generating code via program, but it is
terrible.

Once again, the inherent problem
with the alt tag is that it tries to decide to hide or show the data it
contains depending on whether the image is shown. There are very few, if any
cases, where it can be proven that information given in an alt tag is
absolutely meaningless to someone who can view the image (even a single,
seemingly redundant, bit of text, can greatly clarify the contents of an
image).

As mentioned before, data which is available to
the user regardless of whether the image is shown is infinitely better.

<img
src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/iZ5_LEa2m34dWe1zMfjvZA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Y2g9MzU0MDtjcj0xO2N3PTQ4MDA7ZHg9MDtkeT0wO2ZpPXVsY3JvcDtoPTE0MTtxPTg1O3c9MTkw/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/a8bdbdba7fc5b115f90e6a7067005814.jpg"
width="190" height="141" alt="In this July 15, 2011 photo, atop roughly two
miles of ice, technician Marie McLane launches a data-transmitting weather
balloon at Summit Station, a remote research site operated by the U.S. National
Science Foundation (NSF), and situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of
the Greenland ice sheet. Climate scientists overwhelmingly agree that manmade
greenhouse gases are warming the planet, accelerating the melt of
Greenland&#39;s ice, and yet resistance to the idea appears to have hardened
among many Americans. Why? &quot;The desire to disbelieve deepens as the scale
of the threat grows,&quot; concludes one scholar who has studied the
phenomenon. Analysts now see climate as another battleground in America&#39;s
left-right &quot;culture wars.&quot; (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)" title="In this
July 15, 2011 photo, atop roughly two miles of ice, technician Marie McLane
launches a data-transmitting weather balloon at Summit Station, a remote
research site operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), and
situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the Greenland ice sheet.
Climate scientists overwhelmingly agree that manmade greenhouse gases are
warming the planet, accelerating the melt of Greenland&#39;s ice, and yet
resistance to the idea appears to have hardened among many Americans. Why?
&quot;The desire to disbelieve deepens as the scale of the threat grows,&quot;
concludes one scholar who has studied the phenomenon. Analysts now see climate
as another battleground in America&#39;s left-right &quot;culture wars.&quot;
(AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)">

Source:

http://news.yahoo.com/american-allergy-global-warming-why-171043981.html

-- 
Configure bugmail: http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/userprefs.cgi?tab=email
------- You are receiving this mail because: -------
You are on the CC list for the bug.
Received on Saturday, 24 September 2011 19:36:08 GMT

This archive was generated by hypermail 2.2.0+W3C-0.50 : Friday, 27 April 2012 04:42:44 GMT