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[Bug 10642] No alternative text description for video key frame (poster)

From: <bugzilla@jessica.w3.org>
Date: Thu, 30 Sep 2010 16:25:36 +0000
To: public-html-a11y@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1P1Lwu-0007Vx-GW@jessica.w3.org>
http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=10642

--- Comment #19 from steve faulkner <faulkner.steve@gmail.com> 2010-09-30 16:25:35 UTC ---
(In reply to comment #18)
> (In reply to comment #15)
> > (In reply to comment #4)
> > > Title: 2010 Marathon Coverage
> > > Poster alt: Sally Smith crossing the finish line with her hands upraised.
> > 
> > I think this is a clear example of how poster alt would be useful. Note I am
> > not sure what point comment 13 is making; there will always be examples of bad
> > alt text out there.
> My point is that poster frame may not be representative of the video. That's
> not merely problem of bad alt, but bad poster frames to begin with.
> Poster frame is not original content, it is just placeholder for unloaded
> video. Because in practice poster frames are often automatically selected (e.g.
> first or middle frame of the video) they are often poor representation of video
> as a whole.
> A poster frame for video of "Sally Smith crossing the finish line" might as
> well happen to be "A reporter standing with microphone in front of a crowd". 
> A use case of "user with no or poor vision wanting to know what video is about
> and what mood it has" might not be served by poster description as well as by
> description of the video as a whole.

(In reply to comment #18)
> (In reply to comment #15)
> > (In reply to comment #4)
> > > Title: 2010 Marathon Coverage
> > > Poster alt: Sally Smith crossing the finish line with her hands upraised.
> > 
> > I think this is a clear example of how poster alt would be useful. Note I am
> > not sure what point comment 13 is making; there will always be examples of bad
> > alt text out there.
> My point is that poster frame may not be representative of the video. That's
> not merely problem of bad alt, but bad poster frames to begin with.
> Poster frame is not original content, it is just placeholder for unloaded
> video. Because in practice poster frames are often automatically selected (e.g.
> first or middle frame of the video) they are often poor representation of video
> as a whole.
> A poster frame for video of "Sally Smith crossing the finish line" might as
> well happen to be "A reporter standing with microphone in front of a crowd". 
> A use case of "user with no or poor vision wanting to know what video is about
> and what mood it has" might not be served by poster description as well as by
> description of the video as a whole.

There is the more generic use case described below:
vision impairment is not binary, people are not either totally without sight or
have 20/20 vision, there are may gardiations. a good proportion of people who
are categorised as 'legally blind' have some vision, but  rely on a screen
reader  for the majority of their interaction with web content, when they see a
fuzzy blobs on an image whether it be a video poster frame or on a canvas or an
image, the provision of a text alternative may well be useful in helping them
make sense of what those blobs are.

If the poster frame is not purely decorative it should have a text alternative,
so whether its a frame from the movie, the movie poster, or an ad for budweiser
this information should be provided.

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Received on Thursday, 30 September 2010 16:25:39 UTC

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