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[Bug 10849] provide means to add image content catagories to images

From: <bugzilla@jessica.w3.org>
Date: Thu, 30 Sep 2010 15:29:30 +0000
To: public-html-a11y@w3.org
Message-Id: <E1P1L4c-0004yi-Hf@jessica.w3.org>
http://www.w3.org/Bugs/Public/show_bug.cgi?id=10849

--- Comment #4 from steve faulkner <faulkner.steve@gmail.com> 2010-09-30 15:29:30 UTC ---
(In reply to comment #3)
> Why is "unambiguous categorization" necessary?  It seems that a user should be
> able to quickly ascertain from the alt text what the image is of when that
> categorization is important.  It also seems that knowing something is a chart
> or a photograph of a painting doesn't really help me know whether or not I want
> to listen to the alt text.

it has nothing to do with wheter they listen to the alt text or not.

one of the issues that concerns the html editor is that the role of the <img>
element is available to assistive technology via accessibility APIs he has
stated that browsers should not map the <img> element to a 'graphic' role in
accessibility APIs, because in his view that role should not be conveyed to AT
users. Providing a categorization of images could resolve this issue.

for example:
<img alt="poot" typeof="text"> this keyword could be used to indicate that the
image contains only text. so an accessibility API could provide the follwoing
info:

name="poot"
role="graphic"
typeof="text"

graphical rowser could use this info (when images are turned off) to replace
the img with text without an indication of an image.

AT could offer the user a preference to announce role information only on
images of typeof x, y, z and not on images of typeof="text"

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Received on Thursday, 30 September 2010 15:29:37 UTC

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