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Re: Change Proposal text for HTML WG ISSUE-122 (HTML5 section 4.8.1.1.7)

From: Laura Carlson <laura.lee.carlson@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 2 Dec 2010 19:23:34 -0600
Message-ID: <AANLkTi=22pev72C-Vzsn6hqA6_La9EXvukjak3OYQN8r@mail.gmail.com>
To: public-html-a11y@w3.org, Paul Cotton <Paul.Cotton@microsoft.com>, Sam Ruby <rubys@intertwingly.net>, Maciej Stachowiak <mjs@apple.com>
Hello Everyone,

> As determined at the Task Force teleconference on 2 December, we will
> forward the below referenced change proposal to the HTML WG as our
> recommendation this weekend unless a serious, substantive objection is
> raised on list meantime.
>
> If you have such an objection, please reply on list to this email.
>
>  Today's minutes,where thic source of action is decided, can be found
>  at: http://www.w3.org/2010/12/02-html-a11y-minutes.html

Paul sent his email to this task force expanding scope and calling for
Counter-Proposals for Issue 122 on November 5. In that message the
HTML Chairs set a deadline to "submit counter-proposals, alternate
proposals and revised proposals for this issue by November 27, with
the understanding that it applies to all HTML WG publications." [1]
Today is December 2. Paul, Maciej, and Sam was this a real deadline?

I drafted and submitted a change proposal [2] for Issue 122. This task
force and the WG was alerted to that November 7. [3] From the minutes
it doesn't seem that it was considered at the accessibility
teleconference today. Janina, was it?

Thanks.

Best Regards,
Laura

[1] http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-html-a11y/2010Nov/0071.html
[2] http://www.w3.org/html/wg/wiki/ChangeProposals/TextAlternativesIssue122
[3] http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-html-a11y/2010Nov/0096.html

On 12/2/10, Janina Sajka <janina@rednote.net> wrote:
> As determined at the Task Force teleconference on 2 December, we will
> forward the below referenced change proposal to the HTML WG as our
> recommendation this weekend unless a serious, substantive objection is
> raised on list meantime.
>
>
> If you have such an objection, please reply on list to this email.
>
> Today's minutes,where thic source of action is decided, can be found at:
> http://www.w3.org/2010/12/02-html-a11y-minutes.html
>
> Janina Sajka, Co-Facilitator
> HTML-A11Y Task Force
>
> Gregory J. Rosmaita writes:
>> aloha!
>>
>> as documented in:
>>
>> http://www.w3.org/html/wg/wiki/ChangeProposals/purely_decorative_images
>>
>> in fulfillment of HTML WG Action 195, assigned to me at TPAC 2010:
>>
>> http://www.w3.org/html/wg/tracker/actions/195
>>
>> which seeks to close HTML WG Issue 122:
>>
>> http://www.w3.org/html/wg/tracker/issues/122
>>
>> here is the change proposal providing replacement text for section
>> 4.8.1.1.7 of HTML5
>>
>> --- BEGIN CHANGE PROPOSAL ---
>>
>> Text Describing Purely Decorative Images in HTML5
>>
>>
>> Summary
>>
>> This change proposal addresses ISSUE-122 Lady of Shallott as example of
>> purely decorative image.
>>
>> This change proposal was composed in fulfillment of HTML WG ACTION-195:
>> propose replacement example for lady of shallot example of purely
>> decorative use of image with code example of one of the use cases
>> provided in prose introducing the example
>>
>> Rationale
>>
>> Advice about providing alt text for "purely decorative images, and the
>> definition thereof, should be contained in the HTML5: Techniques for
>> providing useful text alternatives and the Web Content Accessibility
>> Guidelines, version 2.0 (WCAG 2.0).
>>
>> Details
>>
>> Currently, HTML5 section 4.8.1.1.7 states:
>>
>>     4.8.1.1.7 A purely decorative image that doesn't add any information
>>
>>     ISSUE-31 (alt-conformance-requirements) blocks progress to Last Call
>>
>>     In general, if an image is decorative but isn't especially
>>     page-specific, for example an image that forms part of a site-wide
>>     design scheme, the image should be specified in the site's CSS, not
>>     in the markup of the document.
>>
>>     However, a decorative image that isn't discussed by the surrounding
>>     text but still has some relevance can be included in a page using
>>     the img element. Such images are decorative, but still form part of
>>     the content. In these cases, the alt attribute must be present but
>>     its value must be the empty string.
>>
>>     Examples where the image is purely decorative despite being relevant
>>     would include things like a photo of the Black Rock City landscape
>>     in a blog post about an event at Burning Man, or an image of a
>>     painting inspired by a poem, on a page reciting that poem. The
>>     following snippet shows an example of the latter case (only the first
>>     verse is included in this snippet):
>>
>>     <h1>The Lady of Shalott</h1>
>>     <p><img src="shalott.jpeg" alt=""></p>
>>     <p>On either side the river lie<br>
>>     Long fields of barley and of rye,<br>
>>     That clothe the wold and meet the sky;<br>
>>     And through the field the road run by<br>
>>     To many-tower'd Camelot;<br>
>>     And up and down the people go,<br>
>>     Gazing where the lilies blow<br>
>>     Round an island there below,<br>
>>     The island of Shalott.</p>
>>
>>
>> Replace With
>>
>> 4.8.1.1.7 A purely decorative image that doesn't add any information
>>
>> If an image is decorative but isn't especially page-specific -- for
>> example, an image that forms part of a site-wide design scheme -- the
>> image should be specified in the site's or document's CSS, not in the
>> markup of the document.
>>
>> Exceptions to this rule, in cases where CSS cannot be used to display
>> an entirely decorative image, are covered by the HTML5: Techniques for
>> providing useful text alternatives. [HTML ALT TECHS] Authors are also
>> encouraged to consult the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 for
>> more detailed information and acceptable techniques. [WCAG 2.0]
>>
>>
>> Impact
>>
>> Positive Effects
>>
>>     * Provides a single reference for "A purely decorative image that
>>       doesn't add any information" by providing the correct usage guide
>>       for "purely decorative images": define them using CSS;
>>
>>     * Keeps such information in a single reference for developers and
>>       authors;
>>
>> Negative Effects
>>
>>     * none, since advice and guidance on providing appropriate alt text
>>       is already contained in HTML5: Techniques for providing useful
>>       text alternatives [HTML ALT TECHS];
>>
>>
>> Conformance Classes Changes
>>
>> none
>>
>>
>> Risks
>>
>> none
>>
>>
>> References
>>
>>     * HTML5: Techniques for providing useful text alternatives
>>       http://dev.w3.org/html5/alt-techniques/
>>
>>     * Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, version 2.0 (WCAG 2.0)
>>       http://www.w3.org/TR/wcag20
>>
>> --- END CHANGE PROPOSAL ---
>>
>> OPEN QUESTIONS:
>>
>> 1. should the first paragraph of the replacement text contain a warning
>> that it is not possible to annotate background images when using CSS?
>>
>> 2. [your question(s) here]
>>
>> gregory.
>> --------------------------------------------------------------
>> You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of
>> focus.                                           -- Mark Twain
>> --------------------------------------------------------------
>> Gregory J. Rosmaita: oedipus@hicom.net
>>    Camera Obscura: http://www.hicom.net/~oedipus/
>>           Oedipus' Online Complex: http://my.opera.com/oedipus
>> --------------------------------------------------------------
>
> --
>
> Janina Sajka,	Phone:	+1.443.300.2200
> 		sip:janina@asterisk.rednote.net
>
> Chair, Open Accessibility	janina@a11y.org	
> Linux Foundation		http://a11y.org
>
> Chair, Protocols & Formats
> Web Accessibility Initiative	http://www.w3.org/wai/pf
> World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)
>
>
>


-- 
Laura L. Carlson
Received on Friday, 3 December 2010 01:24:08 GMT

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