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Re: Use Cases review

From: Fabien Gandon <Fabien.Gandon@sophia.inria.fr>
Date: Sun, 11 Feb 2007 14:35:27 +0100
Message-ID: <45CF1B9F.7000001@sophia.inria.fr>
To: "Clark, John" <CLARKJ2@ccf.org>, public-grddl-wg@w3.org

John,

Thanks a lot for your detailed review and its extremely clear breakdown.
Your comments have been integrated in version v 1.69 2007/02/11 13:27:22
http://www.w3.org/2001/sw/grddl-wg/doc43/scenario-gallery.htm

Details of this integration are given below.

Regards,

Fabien


Clark, John:
> 1. Introduction[1]:
>   
>   * "There are many dialects in practice among the many XML documents on
> the
>     web."
>     ->
>     "There exist many dialects of XML in use by documents on the web."
>   
Done.

>   * "Some are more formally defined and others exhibit more
> loosely-couple semantics."
>     ->
>     "Some are more formally defined and others exhibit more
> loosely-coupled
>     semantics."
>     Reason: fix for typo
>     Comment: Is "loosely-coupled" the correct modifier, here?  I might
> say "others exhibit looser semantics" or "others allow for more freedom
> of interpretation", instead.
>   
Done. I went for "others allow for more freedom of interpretation"


>   * "Recently, two progressive encoding techniques have emerged to
> overlay
>     additional semantics onto valid XHTML documents: RDF-a and
> microformats
>     offer simple, open data formats built upon existing and widely
> adopted
>     standards."
>     ->
>     "Recently, two progressive encoding techniques, RDFa and
> microformats,
>     have emerged to overlay additional semantics onto valid XHTML
> documents.
>     These techniques offer simple, open data formats built upon existing
> and
>     widely adopted standards."
>   
Done.


>   * "How, for example, does software discover the author of a poem, a
>     spreadsheet and an ontology? And how can software determine whether
>     authors of each are in fact the same person?"
>     ->
>     "How, for example, does software discover the author of a poem, a
>     spreadsheet, or an ontology? And how can software determine whether
>     any two of these authors are in fact the same person?"
>   
Done.


>   * "Any number of those XML documents on the web"
>     ->
>     "Any number of the XML documents on the web"
>   
Done.

>   * 'and whose object is "Stephen King,"'
>     ->
>     'and whose object is "Stephen King".'
>   
Done.

>   * Is the RDF abstraction a "syntax"?  I always thought of it as a
> "model".
>     *shrugs*
>   
I prefer model too. So changed to model.

>   * "For example, Dublin Core meta-data"
>     ->
>     "For example, Dublin Core metadata"
>   
Done.

>   * "The transformation algorithm used to is expressed in an XSLT
>     transformation, dc-extract.xsl."
>     ->
>     "The transformation algorithm used is expressed in an XSLT
>     transformation, dc-extract.xsl."
>   
Done.

>   * "Kayode uses a single-purpose XML vocabulary as the main
> representation
>     format for computer-based patient record. He uses GRDDL to be able
> to
>     able to query these records"
>     ->
>     "Kayode uses a single-purpose XML vocabulary as the main
> representation
>     format for a computer-based patient record. He uses GRDDL to able to
>     query these records"
Done.

>
>   * "Adeline designs a system to allow here company to streamline the
>     publication of Technical Reports. The system relies on shared
> templates
>     for publishing documents and a GRDDL transformation to build an
>     up-to-date RDF index used to create an authoritative repository."
>     ->
>     "Adeline designs a system to allow her company to streamline the
>     publication of Technical Reports. The system relies on shared
> templates
>     for publishing documents and a GRDDL transformation for building an
>     up-to-date RDF index used to create an authoritative repository."
Done.

>
> 2. Use case #2[2]
>
>   * "Querying an XML-based clinical data using an standard ontology"
>     ->
>     "Querying XML-based clinical data using an standard ontology"
>   
Done. I also changed "an standard" to "a standard"
Also changed the ToC.

> 3. Use case #4[3]
>
>   * "She proposes a system that relies on Semantic Web technologies to
> allow
>     here company"
>     ->
>     "She proposes a system that relies on Semantic Web technologies to
> allow
>     her company"
Done.

> 4. Use case #6[4]
>
>   * "In particular, the Atom Publishing Protocol's use of HTTP and
>     single-purpose XML vocabulary as the primary remote messaging
> mechanism
>     which allows Voltaire to easily author various XForm documents that
> use
>     XForm submission elements to dispatch operations on web resources."
>     ->
>     "In particular, the Atom Publishing Protocol uses HTTP and a
>     single-purpose XML vocabulary as its primary remote messaging
> mechanism,
>     which allows Voltaire to easily author various XForm documents that
> use
>     XForm submission elements to dispatch operations on web resources."
>   
Done.

> 5. Use case #7[5]
>   * "Thus it serves a dual purpose for its instances: validation and
>     identifying transforms to glean meaning"
>   
Changed to "Thus it serves a dual purpose for its instances: (1) 
validation and (2) identifying transforms to glean meaning."

> * I think I would season the document more liberally with commas,
> although I left a number of those edits out so that I don't look completely
> insane.
>   
Since I am not a native speaker, I prefer not to take the chance to do 
it myself.

-- 
Fabien - http://www-sop.inria.fr/acacia/fabien/
Received on Sunday, 11 February 2007 13:38:06 GMT

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