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Re: Conformance Labels

From: Chimezie Ogbuji <ogbujic@bio.ri.ccf.org>
Date: Tue, 5 Sep 2006 16:44:24 -0400 (EDT)
To: Harry Halpin <hhalpin@ibiblio.org>
cc: Dan Connolly <connolly@w3.org>, public-grddl-wg <public-grddl-wg@w3.org>
Message-ID: <Pine.GSO.4.60.0609051616480.16094@joplin.bio.ri.ccf.org>


On Tue, 5 Sep 2006, Harry Halpin wrote:
>
> To me, the value of conformance labels - or, as I would prefer it, just
> a "standard vocabulary" for talking about GRDDL -  is primarily a
> practical question. Does having a uniform vocabulary to describe the
> various components of a GRDDL processs help or hinder its explanation?
> If the component names are intuitive and help make things easier for
> people to talk about GRDDL, then it might be a good idea. If the names
> make things more complicated and the spec harder to read, then they're
> probably a bad idea. We already talk about "transformations" but we
> don't have a word to talk about the actual program that runs the
> transformation, or a document that is capable of being transformed.

I couldn't agree more.  I personally believe having labels that clearly 
outline the roles of the 'actors' makes advocacy, education, and the 
ratification we are currently going through *much* easier
  and I too have also noticed we aren't even consistent with the 
terminology we use amongst ourselves.

For instance, I could imagine how much more convoluted 
conversation about the XML infoset would be without labels such as 
'well-formed' and 'valid.'  These are crucial in forming consistency in 
the vernacular we use when discussing behavior that is very specific and 
not very digestable to the uninitiated.

> I'd go through the documents (including the primer and use-cases
> document) and look for particular sentences where matters at hand are
> ambiguous or whether using a standardized vocabulary would help makes
> things more clear.
>
> However, I'm a bit overburdened to take that action item on myself
> right now. Chime - what do you think?

I think it's a good idea and I might as well take a shot at it since I'm 
working on the conformance labels anyways.  Here are some examples from a 
brief read of the Usecase document (in it's current form):

Use case #1 - Scheduling : Jane is trying to coordinate a meeting.

"Jane runs this query using her GRDDL-aware SPARQL engine that fetches 
each web page and uses GRDDL to extract triples from each one, combining 
them into a single model against which the query is evaluated."

becomes

"Jane runs this query against RDF extracted by a GRDDL 
Processor from each page, combining them into a single model against which the query is evaluated."

Use case #2: Health Care: Querying an XML-based clinical data using an standard ontology

"Kayode could design a web-based user interface that worked with a client 
that understood GRDDL and could pick computer-based patient records from 
a remote server (as XML documents). Each would be associated with a GRDDL 
profile that extracted clinical data as RDF expressed in a universally 
supported vocabulary for a computer-based patient record."

becomes

"Kayode could design a web-based user interface that worked with a 
GRDDL Processor and could pick computer-based patient records from 
a remote server.  Each would be a GRDDL document associated 
with transforms that extracted clinical data as RDF expressed in a universally 
supported vocabulary for a computer-based patient record."

Use case #3 - Aggregating data: Stephan wants a synthetic review before buying a guitar.

"Reviews published using hReview microformat can be discovered using 
existing search services. The documents can be GRDDL'd into RDF and 
aggregated together in a store. "

becomes

"Reviews published using hReview microformat can be discovered using 
existing search services. The (GRDDL?) documents can be consumed by a 
GRDDL Processor to extract RDF which can be aggregated together in a 
store."

Use case #4 - Querying sites and digital libraries: DC4Plus Corp. wants to automate the publication of its electronic documents.

"Then GRDDL transformations (XSLT stylesheets) extract these metadata in 
RDF."

".. the XHTML documents put online follow official templates allows GRDDL 
stylesheets to be defined to extract corresponding RDF annotations that 
can then be used to .."

becomes

"Then GRDDL Processors can extract these metadata in RDF."

".. the XHTML (GRDDL) documents put online follow official templates 
allows GRDDL Processors to be defined to extract corresponding RDF annotations that 
can then be used to .."

Use case #5 - Wikis and e-learning: The Technical University of Marcilly decided to use wikis to foster knowledge exchanges between lecturers and students.

"The embedded RDF is extracted using a GRDDL XSLT stylesheets available 
online to provide semantic annotations directly to the application that 
needs to extract the embedded metadata:"

becomes

"The embedded RDF is extracted by a GRDDL Processor using XSLT stylesheets 
available online to provide semantic annotations directly to the application that 
needs to extract the embedded metadata:"

Etc..

Chimezie Ogbuji
Lead Systems Analyst
Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Cleveland Clinic Foundation
9500 Euclid Avenue/ W26
Cleveland, Ohio 44195
Office: (216)444-8593
ogbujic@ccf.org
Received on Tuesday, 5 September 2006 20:44:49 GMT

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